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Why You Should Opt Out of Sharing Data With Your Mobile Provider

Condobloke

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I have been pondering on giving up my cell phone completely - I rarely use the thing - and usually use the landline exclusively has a much better connection
 
This confuses some people:

I actually leave the house without my cell phone.

Back when mobile phones were bag phones and bricks was when I became a slave to my phone. For legitimate reasons, I had a phone on me at all times. (Which might also mean I suck at delegating, but I could also use it for connectivity reasons back when hotels didn't have internet.) I was a slave to my phone, long before they were smart.

So, I don't have my phone on me all the time - even if I'm leaving the house, driving something inappropriate, going way off the beaten track, or perhaps just into the village.

I do have *a* phone that functions as my ISP, but that never leaves the house.
 
We have two cells from different providers, no landline.
My wife does all the talking, she does not even know how to send a message.:p
I pay extra 5$ a month for 1G data just for occasional navigation.
No , I don't connect the phones to even my home internet, nor sleep anywhere near them.
 
Thanks, Brian, I read Krebs' article with interest.

In Australia, these matters are covered by

The Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1997 (TIA Act) and

The Privacy Act 1988

and probably other instruments as well.

I don't use my mobile phone for any internet transactions. And I only turn on the Bluetooth to transfer a picture for this place to the computer and then switch off Bluetooth again.

I am mostly with His Lordship at #2.

I get free untimed calls nationwide, what more do I need?

Wizard
 


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