Would appriciate some assistance uninstalling Windows 10 and Installing Linux on my HP Pavilion x360 Convertible 14m-dh0xxx

smokie_vcs

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If there's anyone who could lend me a hand in this I would greatly appreciate it. This is my only machine, and don't want to make a mistake that might leave with a fancy piece of metal, you know?? I know this is probably very amature of me, but I'm hoping this can be a place were I can learn, and share my knowledge with others too!!! I love technology, and I've only just scratched the surface, but wow has it opened up an amazing world to me. Greatly appreciate the help, and I look forward to making the switch over to Linux!
 


captain-sensible

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ok i will set the scene. I would say there are a few key principles including preparation , patience, not assuming anything and information gathering. There are quite a few on here that will help. You've had no replies so far because your post was early and some on here are either many hours time ahead or behind.

So first we need some info, some might seem daft but its not dadt if it applies to you. First off you say only "my only machine" so are are you going to try and use an Android phone to browse web and come back here if you end up with no OS at one point ? or have access to friends PC's

Now i'm writing this using a Linux OS on a HP laptop so its possible
 

captain-sensible

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I'm not going to go and look up specs so you have to tell us. What hard drive capacity do you have, maybe you can leave windows on . Probably if its Windows 10 its going to be 64bit UEFI with an EFI partition. now ifyou have some knowledge then you may find it patronizing so what level of knowledge roughly do you have. First i would do nothing but go research your hd capacity, find out if your boot is mbr gpt uefi firmware etc
 

captain-sensible

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The reason i say that is i got my HP laptop also with Windows 10 ; i just went ahead and wiped everything including the efi partition which for my set up i needed, so had to re-create it. A couple of 4 -8 gig usb sticks are useful and a lot on here use booting from usb to install. That basically sets out the ball game. Others will reply, i will chip in.. do you have any clue as to the Linix OS you want to try ..don't say kali linux
 

smokie_vcs

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Makes sense, and sounds good! What I meant is that this is the only laptop I have to work on. I only have beginner java coding skills, and just the basics of how computers work.
 

smokie_vcs

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I have Ubuntu burned onto an 8 gig SD card and I have the virtual box machine to run it for now, but ultimately I want to do away with windows. I'm really done with windows
 

smokie_vcs

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I've been reading up on Ubuntu and have a good understanding on it I feel, but of course in the big scope of it I know very little lol. I'll look up all the necessary utilities my machine needs to work.
 

smokie_vcs

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Drivers=DVD/CD-ROM , Microsoft Virtual DVD/ROM;
Firmware=UEFI\CC_00010002 , UEFI\RES , Compatible Ids GenFirmwareResource;
Processor=INTEL64_FAMILY_6_MODEL_142+Intel_CoreI3-8145U_CPU @2.10GHZ\_1 //There is four of these// , Compatible Ids ACPI\GENUINEINTEL;
Sensors= HID Sensor Collection V2 , HID\VID;
CPU=ACPI x64-based PC; RAM=8GB(7.83); Storage=119DB;

My bad for taking so long. I got lost in the sauce, but I know the entire system now. I also feel more confident, and eager in moving forward.
 

Vrai

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If there's anyone who could lend me a hand in this I would greatly appreciate it. This is my only machine, and don't want to make a mistake that might leave with a fancy piece of metal, you know?? I know this is probably very amature of me, but I'm hoping this can be a place were I can learn, and share my knowledge with others too!!! I love technology, and I've only just scratched the surface, but wow has it opened up an amazing world to me. Greatly appreciate the help, and I look forward to making the switch over to Linux!
First thing to do is to make a bootable "Live" disk image of Ubuntu (or whatever distro desired) on either a USB thumb drive or a DVD optical disk (user preference).

Then boot your machine from the "bootable live disk image" and see if everything works as expected.
I would do that before changing any partitions or wiping the hard drive.

Running it in a virtual machine is all fine but in my opinion (and experience) it is not the same as running on actual physical hardware. If something does not work, or does not work as expected, you may be able to find answers before 'diving into the deep end'.

Also, it really helps to have access to another machine with internet connection - just in case.
 

MadOldDog

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Drivers=DVD/CD-ROM , Microsoft Virtual DVD/ROM;
Firmware=UEFI\CC_00010002 , UEFI\RES , Compatible Ids GenFirmwareResource;
Processor=INTEL64_FAMILY_6_MODEL_142+Intel_CoreI3-8145U_CPU @2.10GHZ\_1 //There is four of these// , Compatible Ids ACPI\GENUINEINTEL;
Sensors= HID Sensor Collection V2 , HID\VID;
CPU=ACPI x64-based PC; RAM=8GB(7.83); Storage=119DB;

My bad for taking so long. I got lost in the sauce, but I know the entire system now. I also feel more confident, and eager in moving forward.
Some suggestions for you, based on the School of Hard Knocks:

First, don't mess with that Windows 10 "disk" . It is your fall-back and fail-safe if you can take it out and store it in a static-free bag.

Go get a new SSD of 512 MB or better. The more empty space on an SSD the better for long life, so go as big as your budget allows, then install it.

Boot from your USB key, and assuming the system runs to your satisfaction, including a network connection, start the Linux installation.

Once the installation is complete, shut the system off and remove the USB key.

Your system restart ought to be fast enough to make you smile. You'll be reading all the initial system setup information and staying busy for a bit as you configure the system and add software from that huge list of available free programs. FreeDoom anybody?

Later you will almost certainly find there was something on the Windows 10 drive that you didn't back up /transfer. Because you set that drive aside, you can now use a USB adapter to connect it to the Linux box, and Hey look at that! you can browse the files on that drive and search for the pictures or whatever you are missing. Once done copying stuff, unmount the external drive and store it away again. Repeat as required :)

If, for reasons that seem good to you, the Linux system does work out, then you can unplug that Linux SSD and reinstall the Windows 10 drive. Should you have a HD with Windows 10 on it, I bet living with the new SSD will have you wanting to transfer WIndows 10 to that SSD, but that is a topic for another day.
 

smokie_vcs

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First thing to do is to make a bootable "Live" disk image of Ubuntu (or whatever distro desired) on either a USB thumb drive or a DVD optical disk (user preference).

Then boot your machine from the "bootable live disk image" and see if everything works as expected.
I would do that before changing any partitions or wiping the hard drive.

Running it in a virtual machine is all fine but in my opinion (and experience) it is not the same as running on actual physical hardware. If something does not work, or does not work as expected, you may be able to find answers before 'diving into the deep end'.

Also, it really helps to have access to another machine with internet connection - just in case.
Hello Vria! So I would say I was like 90% successful, and I did keep windows as suggested! I had trouble with BIOS and configuring the boot setting. After much trial and error I was able to set up the correct configuration, and I was able to install Ubuntu along side Windows 10. However, during my trail and error, I messed up the Network Adapter in Ubuntu. Everything else checked out though! This didn't cause any major issues with Windows 10, everything is working correctly, so I know my mistake involves an intel file/driver associated with wifi. I'm now figuring that out, but I feel like I can do it.....hopefully lol Thank you for help, it means a lot!
 

smokie_vcs

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Some suggestions for you, based on the School of Hard Knocks:

First, don't mess with that Windows 10 "disk" . It is your fall-back and fail-safe if you can take it out and store it in a static-free bag.

Go get a new SSD of 512 MB or better. The more empty space on an SSD the better for long life, so go as big as your budget allows, then install it.

Boot from your USB key, and assuming the system runs to your satisfaction, including a network connection, start the Linux installation.

Once the installation is complete, shut the system off and remove the USB key.

Your system restart ought to be fast enough to make you smile. You'll be reading all the initial system setup information and staying busy for a bit as you configure the system and add software from that huge list of available free programs. FreeDoom anybody?

Later you will almost certainly find there was something on the Windows 10 drive that you didn't back up /transfer. Because you set that drive aside, you can now use a USB adapter to connect it to the Linux box, and Hey look at that! you can browse the files on that drive and search for the pictures or whatever you are missing. Once done copying stuff, unmount the external drive and store it away again. Repeat as required :)

If, for reasons that seem good to you, the Linux system does work out, then you can unplug that Linux SSD and reinstall the Windows 10 drive. Should you have a HD with Windows 10 on it, I bet living with the new SSD will have you wanting to transfer WIndows 10 to that SSD, but that is a topic for another day.
Hello MadOldDog! So you pretty much predicted what happened. I would say I was 90% successful. I was able to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 10. I did have trouble figuring out the how BIOS works. I had trouble setting up the proper configuration for the USB Drive installation. With some trial and error and was able to install Ubuntu successfully...somewhat lol. The missing 10% is dealing with the Network Adapter in Ubuntu. Everything works fine on the Windows 10 side. I think my mistake deals with an intel file/drive that is a part of establishing wifi. This is where I'm at now. I do feel like I can solve this....hopefully lol Thank you for the help MadOldDog, it means a lot!
 

smokie_vcs

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My apologies MadOldDog and Vria, for messing up my individual reply to guys. My profile name says it all lol I do enjoy myself a doobie. My apologies again guys.


And thank you captain-sensible, your help in the beginning means a lot! I feel like I'm off to a good start.
 



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