File Permissions - chmod

CptCharis

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Just choose a category and you will see a blue button

“ post new thread “

B7A592B4-BBE0-42E5-9684-6C47D5A7416A.png
 


rado84

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That's a nice tutorial but I found a lot easier way - with fstab: just add "uid=1000" in the options for each partition you want to be its owner, reboot and that's it.

Code:
UUID=79efb309-826e-40a7-a786-7b83b682dcb4 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
UUID=88FCD635FCD61CEE /media/rado/Drive_D               ntfs    errors=remount-ro,uid=1000 0       1
UUID=6F01A23F6CA00FCF /media/rado/Drive_E               ntfs    errors=remount-ro,uid=1000 0       1
 

wizardfromoz

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You are already uid=1000 by default, as the first normal (non-root) user set up by the system.

Code:
grep 1000 /etc/passwd

... should show rado and 1000

Also, although you may only be showing an example above with the NTFS partitions/drives, that method might have relevance if you are playing games that were Windows-based and you want to be able to access them (say, under Steam or Proton) under Linux so as not to have to set up new files, but other than that you are lowering security.

@Rob has, at the beginning

We will show you how to understand file permission symbols and how to modify certain files so that they're more secure.

My highlighting.

Besides, in Linux, you already have root privileges over Windows NTFS files and folders.

An example is here

Code:
[email protected]:~$ cd /media/chris/OS/Windows/System32/GroupPolicy
[email protected]:/media/chris/OS/Windows/System32/GroupPolicy$ ls -l
total 1
-rwxrwxrwx 1 chris chris 128 Mar  5 13:45 GPT.INI
drwxrwxrwx 1 chris chris   0 Feb  2 13:07 Machine
drwxrwxrwx 1 chris chris   0 Feb  2 13:07 User

So I already own those files and folders, without having to change anything.

Chmod (this Tutorial's subject) and chown are designed to be able to change the defaults of user access as part of a secure plan by the Administrator, as well as, in the case of chown, modifying downloaded files to make them executable.

Again as Rob has said, in 2013,

chmod 777 mydoc.txt read, write, execute for all! (may not be the best plan in the world...)

Whatever works for you with fstab, though, is great, it is a very useful file.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

wizardfromoz

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setuid

Welcome to linux.org @shadow543 :). Google under

linux srwxrwxr-x

... and you will find some good reading.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

f33dm3bits

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how to change a file's owner like i create a file but i want to change file ownership
With the chown command, try man chown.
Code:
EXAMPLES
       chown root /u
              Change the owner of /u to "root".

       chown root:staff /u
              Likewise, but also change its group to "staff".

       chown -hR root /u
              Change the owner of /u and subfiles to "root".
 

Harish Rathaur

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With the chown command, try man chown.
Code:
EXAMPLES
       chown root /u
              Change the owner of /u to "root".

       chown root:staff /u
              Likewise, but also change its group to "staff".

       chown -hR root /u
              Change the owner of /u and subfiles to "root".
Thank you so much it is very help full for me.
thanks again
 

Bharghav

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This would help someone what exactly the numbers are in permissions,
so 4 in binary format is represented as 100 and 2 is 010 and 1 is 001.
What this means? Consider 'r', 'w', 'x' you either want them set or not set i.e., in binary digit representation it is either 0 or 1.
Therefore, when we want a file to have permission for any user group,
if it is 'rwx' => 111 ( set , set, set) => 100 + 010 + 001 => 4 + 2 + 1 => 7
Inturn 7 in binary representation is 111 = 1*2^2 + 1*2^1 + 1*2^0 = 7

'rw-' = 110 = 100 + 010 + 000 = 4+2 = 6
'r-x' = 101 = 100 + 000 + 001 = 4 + 1 = 5
'-wx' = 011 = 000 + 010 + 001 = 3
and similarly other combinations.

Hope this helps.
 
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I just wanna know for a small query that is it possible to change permission out of directory? (i.e: Software and as well as others staff)
 

mrp

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day 1 and I learnt a lot from first lesson itself, post and comments are very helpful.
 
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