How do I get past this screen?

DikWipe69

New Member
I was trying to download Minecraft on Manjaro and I was downloading something in the add/remove Futures thing and it wouldn’t work so I deleted some stuff in the AUR tab. Immediately everything got screwed up so I restarted my computer and I got met with this screen. I know my password but I can’t remember my username and I tried every thing I can think of. Any help would be appreciated since I don’t want to have to redowbload Manjaro since I’ve got so much stuff on my pc.
 

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Peer

Active Member
First I can try to log in as root, and try to fix everything. There should be a dir with ur user name in the /home dir.
you can also try to press ctrl+alt+F1 or F7, F2... Just try... The interface should change from tty to your desktop.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
if you do not succeed, and you have to reinstall Manjaro.....make sure you install Timeshift first, before doing anything else
 

Vrai

Active Member
if you do not succeed, and you have to reinstall Manjaro.....make sure you install Timeshift first, before doing anything else
Just out of curiosity - how would one install Timeshift if one cannot log in? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ :)
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
boot a usb with that distro on it....install timeshift.....choosing the same settings as exist on your initial install.....follow the prompts to Restore. You will have to choose where to restore from and where to restore to. As soon as Timeshift realises the settings are familiar, it all just falls into place. Easy as pie.
 

Vrai

Active Member
boot a usb with that distro on it....install timeshift.....choosing the same settings as exist on your initial install.....follow the prompts to Restore. You will have to choose where to restore from and where to restore to. As soon as Timeshift realises the settings are familiar, it all just falls into place. Easy as pie.
Thanks for that answer. I got to thinking about it and tried to find some info on running Timeshift from a "live" environment but haven't found anything yet. I came back here to ask if it would work. Does it have to be the same distro do you think?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
I haven't tried it with a different distro. I run LM 18.3 (cinnamon) and I have a usb with a copy of that same distro on it.....the usb of course is not updated....it is now a coup0le of years old.

However, nor is Timeshift updated on the usb.......and it still works like a boss !!

I cannot imagine it would make any difference using a different distro......the point of the whole thing is that you are using Timeshift. Whether there are differences in Timeshift between different families of distros (ubuntu derivatives vs arch linux etc)....I have no idea and have no intention of finding out.

Linux Mint in one form or another is the simplest, most popular Linux available. It works. And (thank God) so does Timeshift.

On another note...Timeshift is made etc etc etc by a guy named Tony George. He deserves support....$$

Otherwise the product which has saved out collective asses will likely die out.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Missed a bit....running Timeshift from a 'live' environment is no different to running it from an installed environment. You would simply need to know the name of the drive/place that the snapshots are backed up to,(so Timeshift can "find" them) and the name of the drive/place which is the place of the main install.(so timeshift knows where to send the Restored files etc)....you would need to know this so that you can fill in the blanks for Timeshift
 
Last edited:

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
I am a bit late to the party - internet outages over the last 2 days, and may continue, so while I am available



(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke)

Does it have to be the same distro do you think?
Nope - any Distro on a Live stick can be used.

You get a headstart with a stick holding Linux Mint 18.3 or newer, or Linux Lite 4.x , because Timeshift ships with those Distros.

For all other Distros you can install Timeshift on a Live stick with the methods I describe at my Timeshift thread HERE.

For Live sticks where Persistence is not enabled, you will only have Timeshift at hand until the end of the session, lost when you reboot. But that is all you need - my suggestion is that in the Live scenario you turn off screensaver and power saving facilities so that your screen session is not interrupted while you are restoring.

The version of Timeshift you get on all sticks is a slightly cut-down version in that it can be used for Restoring purposes only, not for taking a snapshot - makes sense. It warns you of that.

Where Brian (@Condobloke ) says

You would simply need to know the name of the drive/place that the snapshots are backed up to,(so Timeshift can "find" them) and the name of the drive/place which is the place of the main install.(so timeshift knows where to send the Restored files etc)....you would need to know this so that you can fill in the blanks for Timeshift
... quite right, but this can be addressed easily with a combination of GParted and Timeshift's comments.

Following is a shot of my Timeshift "Settings - Location" page (the default is smaller but you can drag the handles to reveal, in your own environment)



SCREENSHOT 1 - A PART OF WIZARD'S DISTROS AS RELATED TO TIMESHIFT

You can see near the bottom of the Western Digital My Book entries (/dev/sdb) there is the highlighted radio button for my Timeshift UEFI snapshots storage, that is /dev/sdc40, and it is 500 GiB or so.

Similarly, if the subject Distro I needed to restore was Bluestar Linux (Arch-based, at /dev/sdb38) or ArcoLinux with the Xfce desktop, it is at /dev/sdc10 on the Solid State Drive /dev/sdc.

Easy Peasy.

Easy only because, with GParted, when I install a Distro, I Label its root partition, the added benefit is that these then appear in my File Manager as well. I also use it as a Planner, and Name Partitions with action needing to be taken, as you can see with 3 above.

Cheers

Wizard
 

DikWipe69

New Member
First I can try to log in as root, and try to fix everything. There should be a dir with ur user name in the /home dir.
you can also try to press ctrl+alt+F1 or F7, F2... Just try... The interface should change from tty to your desktop.
I’m so sorry guys I got it. I posted it on two websites and I forgot. Apologies but thanks so much for the responses
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Care to share with us what was the solution you found?

Wizard
 

DikWipe69

New Member
Care to share with us what was the solution you found?

Wizard
Lol I can’t really say it was much of a solution. On the manjaro site some people tried to help me by putting some code in or something. None of it worked so I just ended up reinstalling manjaro. I didn’t have a ton of stuff on it so it wasn’t that big of a deal but it did kind of suck. I can link the thread if anyone is interested but I can’t really say I got it ‘fixed’.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
SO....where are you right now with Minecraft ? (This topic managed to get sidetracked to all about Timeshift )
Is manjaro working ok in general ?

Have you remembered your username ?

Can you retrieve your username via email from Minecraft ? (I know nothing about minecraft so forgive me if that is a dumb suggestion )
 

Vrai

Active Member
I am a bit late to the party - internet outages over the last 2 days, and may continue, so while I am available



(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke)



Nope - any Distro on a Live stick can be used.

You get a headstart with a stick holding Linux Mint 18.3 or newer, or Linux Lite 4.x , because Timeshift ships with those Distros.

For all other Distros you can install Timeshift on a Live stick with the methods I describe at my Timeshift thread HERE.

For Live sticks where Persistence is not enabled, you will only have Timeshift at hand until the end of the session, lost when you reboot. But that is all you need - my suggestion is that in the Live scenario you turn off screensaver and power saving facilities so that your screen session is not interrupted while you are restoring.

The version of Timeshift you get on all sticks is a slightly cut-down version in that it can be used for Restoring purposes only, not for taking a snapshot - makes sense. It warns you of that.

Where Brian (@Condobloke ) says



... quite right, but this can be addressed easily with a combination of GParted and Timeshift's comments.

Following is a shot of my Timeshift "Settings - Location" page (the default is smaller but you can drag the handles to reveal, in your own environment)



SCREENSHOT 1 - A PART OF WIZARD'S DISTROS AS RELATED TO TIMESHIFT

You can see near the bottom of the Western Digital My Book entries (/dev/sdb) there is the highlighted radio button for my Timeshift UEFI snapshots storage, that is /dev/sdc40, and it is 500 GiB or so.

Similarly, if the subject Distro I needed to restore was Bluestar Linux (Arch-based, at /dev/sdb38) or ArcoLinux with the Xfce desktop, it is at /dev/sdc10 on the Solid State Drive /dev/sdc.

Easy Peasy.

Easy only because, with GParted, when I install a Distro, I Label its root partition, the added benefit is that these then appear in my File Manager as well. I also use it as a Planner, and Name Partitions with action needing to be taken, as you can see with 3 above.

Cheers

Wizard
Thanks @wizardfromoz ! I was going to ask you if I didn't get it sorted. But I like to try and find answers for myself first. I had a suspicion you may have some insightful input to this question :)
 

dos2unix

Active Member
I don't know if this works on Debian/Mint or so.. I think it would.
But on redhat/fedora distro's, you can try typing....

systemctl set-default graphical.target (boot into GUI environment)

or

systemctl set-default multi-user.target (boot into CLI environment)

keep in mind if you don't have all the requirements for wayland/Xwindows it still won't work.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
I've been meaning to get back to the original question for a couple of days, as I got sidetracked with talk about Timeshift, which is one of my passions (Can you tell? What gave it away? :))

Simplest (IMO) answer applies across all the Distros I use (90 or thereabouts) from 4 of the Linux families - RPM, Debian, Gentoo and Arch

Be at your Grub Menu, after booting, and before your timer runs out (10 seconds with some, and less with others, you can change it to what suits).

If you have only one Linux Distro and no Windows, your Grub Menu is hidden by default. You can bring it up at startup with the following:

  1. If your computer uses BIOS for booting, then hold down the Shift key while GRUB is loading to get the boot menu.
  2. If your computer uses UEFI for booting, press Esc several times while GRUB is loading to get the boot menu.

At the Grub Menu, down the bottom are options, choose 'e' for editing your startup parameters, you will be presented with maybe half a dozen lines, navigation is by arrow keys.

Possibly 2nd-bottom line will be one which starts with "linux" and mentions the Kernel, may be something like

4.9.0-11

or 5.2.1.xx

...whatever

Press End to go to the end of that line, and place a space, then

Type in

Code:
single init=/bin/bash
Press F10 to continue to boot.

You will be dropped into a shell, where the prompt may say

debian#

or

linuxmint#

or similar.

You are Root. It may take an enter or two to get to this prompt, some Distros print a message first and the cursor hangs.

Now type in and enter

Code:
cat /etc/passwd
and there will be output of maybe 30 lines, which includes your username.

This in itself is not a security risk, so I will print mine from Debian

[email protected]:~$ cat /etc/passwd
root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/bash
daemon:x:1:1:daemon:/usr/sbin:/usr/sbin/nologin
bin:x:2:2:bin:/bin:/usr/sbin/nologin
sys:x:3:3:sys:/dev:/usr/sbin/nologin
sync:x:4:65534:sync:/bin:/bin/sync
games:x:5:60:games:/usr/games:/usr/sbin/nologin
man:x:6:12:man:/var/cache/man:/usr/sbin/nologin
lp:x:7:7:lp:/var/spool/lpd:/usr/sbin/nologin
mail:x:8:8:mail:/var/mail:/usr/sbin/nologin
news:x:9:9:news:/var/spool/news:/usr/sbin/nologin
uucp:x:10:10:uucp:/var/spool/uucp:/usr/sbin/nologin
proxy:x:13:13:proxy:/bin:/usr/sbin/nologin
www-data:x:33:33:www-data:/var/www:/usr/sbin/nologin
backup:x:34:34:backup:/var/backups:/usr/sbin/nologin
list:x:38:38:Mailing List Manager:/var/list:/usr/sbin/nologin
irc:x:39:39:ircd:/var/run/ircd:/usr/sbin/nologin
gnats:x:41:41:Gnats Bug-Reporting System (admin):/var/lib/gnats:/usr/sbin/nologin
nobody:x:65534:65534:nobody:/nonexistent:/usr/sbin/nologin
systemd-timesync:x:100:102:systemd Time Synchronization,,,:/run/systemd:/bin/false
systemd-network:x:101:103:systemd Network Management,,,:/run/systemd/netif:/bin/false
systemd-resolve:x:102:104:systemd Resolver,,,:/run/systemd/resolve:/bin/false
systemd-bus-proxy:x:103:105:systemd Bus Proxy,,,:/run/systemd:/bin/false
_apt:x:104:65534::/nonexistent:/bin/false
uuidd:x:105:109::/run/uuidd:/bin/false
dnsmasq:x:106:65534:dnsmasq,,,:/var/lib/misc:/bin/false
avahi-autoipd:x:107:110:Avahi autoip daemon,,,:/var/lib/avahi-autoipd:/bin/false
messagebus:x:108:111::/var/run/dbus:/bin/false
usbmux:x:109:46:usbmux daemon,,,:/var/lib/usbmux:/bin/false
speech-dispatcher:x:110:29:Speech Dispatcher,,,:/var/run/speech-dispatcher:/bin/false
rtkit:x:111:115:RealtimeKit,,,:/proc:/bin/false
lightdm:x:112:116:Light Display Manager:/var/lib/lightdm:/bin/false
pulse:x:113:117:pulseAudio daemon,,,:/var/run/pulse:/bin/false
avahi:x:114:119:Avahi mDNS daemon,,,:/var/run/avahi-daemon:/bin/false
chris:x:1000:1000:chris,,,:/home/chris:/bin/bash
sshd:x:115:65534::/run/sshd:/usr/sbin/nologin
Debian-exim:x:116:120::/var/spool/exim4:/bin/false

I am doing this from a Debian session, so the first line does not show me as Root.

I have highlighted my username line, which will typically be in the last 5 - 6 lines, even the last.

Some Distros will show chris:x:1000 instead of 2 of the 1000, others chris:x:1000:1007 - etc, but all are similar.

I expect you will remember your username when you see it, even if it is

turkey_lurkey132eZZ

Yes?

Having established this, you can now reboot and type in your username at login.

For most, this is achieved with Ctrl-Alt-Del but some may require a hard reboot (power down, power up).

Before leaving you, at the OP:

You must have done a good number on your Manjaro to get to this point. All Manjaro, and almost all other Distros, have your username appear by default at the login. Kali and Debian itself are two notable exceptions.

Which leads us back to Timeshift. :)

Wizard
 

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