Kingston 64 Bit Thumb Drive: Umount Not Installed: Target is Busy SOLVED

Commiserations, Alex. It is hard losing a family member....particularly hard when they were close as you and your Uncle were.

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time — the mind, protecting its sanity — covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy.

Cry, mate.....as much as you like, and need to.
Thanks, brother--
 


Alex, I am sure that those of us who know you well, and even those who don't but have seen how giving you are around the forum, will join with me in wishing condolences on you and your family.

I found Brian's quote from Rose Kennedy very comforting for me over the last (nearly) 11 months, and I still do.

Chris
 
If the memory stick was formatted as NTFS or FAT/VFAT, there is a system process (I forget which one) that tends to end up keeping the device open and preventing you from in mounting the device. I’ve seen this a few times.

Attempting to unmount the disk while the process is still running, results in a "Device is busy" error message. The only way to unmount is to kill the process first.

For the life of me, I can’t remember which process it was. But to find out, I remember using lsof /dev/sdx, where /dev/sdx was the path to the device that’s being blocked by the process.
That yielded the name of the process that was keeping the device open. Then it was just a case of killing the running process and then it was possible to actually unmount the device.
 
I like to say that it never gets better - but it does get easier.

Reach out if you need to.
 
If the memory stick was formatted as NTFS or FAT/VFAT, there is a system process (I forget which one) that tends to end up keeping the device open and preventing you from in mounting the device. I’ve seen this a few times.

Attempting to unmount the disk while the process is still running, results in a "Device is busy" error message. The only way to unmount is to kill the process first.

For the life of me, I can’t remember which process it was. But to find out, I remember using lsof /dev/sdx, where /dev/sdx was the path to the device that’s being blocked by the process.
That yielded the name of the process that was keeping the device open. Then it was just a case of killing the running process and then it was possible to actually unmount the device.
IT was formatted as FAT by Foxclone.
I used lsof to stop the process and the cmd-line returned "Terminated"
However, I couldn't seem to unmount it even with the kill cmd and the exact pid:-
Next time I'll kill the process first if it happens again.

When I have more time I'll make a note of what you typed out so I don't forget in the future. Thanks! Jas-
 
I like to say that it never gets better - but it does get easier.

Reach out if you need to.
Yeah, it does get easier.
 
I usually take notes on the advise I'm given so I don't have a repeat in the future.
Got really low energy right now, so I'll be back later and then mark the thread solved--
 
Ahhh... sounds like the 'ole stuck in cache' gotcha.

A lot of times, if you're reading from, or writing to an external device, like a USB thumb drive for example.
Usually this happens when copying a large file to or from the USB drive.

The GUI progress bar or even the CLI prompt will come back, and you'll think good it's finished.
But in reality your computer is lying to you.

I've found that running a 'sync' usually helps speed things up a little.

#> sync; eject

or

#> sync; umount /my/really/long/path/to/some/mount/point/somewhere

that sometimes forces it to "really" finish writing whatever it's doing.
In the GUI some desktops give you the "safe to remove drive" like windows does.
Very helpful, thanks!
 
Alexzee,

I'm very sorry for your loss.
 

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