Learning Command Line

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Phedup

Guest
If the OP wants to learn the GNU/Linux command-line, then why are you suggesting a different OS?

How literal can u get? Patently, Jeremy Johnson is referring to Ubuntu in his 2nd sentence. It amazes me that you think he's referring to a different O.S. And why r u so nasty?

Yes, that's right, Phedup!
 


P

Phedup

Guest
If the OP was interested in answers, he/she would have made at least one more post in the last 4 1/2 months. If this thread benefits anyone, it will not be the OP. (I hate drive-by posters.:mad:)
With all the Ubuntu help out there, is there some law that a post-er must post every day, or whatever? Phedup
 
P

Phedup

Guest
If the OP wants to learn the GNU/Linux command-line, then why are you suggesting a different OS?
Jeremy mentioned only Linux OS in his 2nd sentence. Patently, he's referring to that subject. Where in his post do you find another OS mentioned? And why r u so nasty?

Phedup!
 
P

Phedup

Guest
Welcome to the future.

So, I started learning bash way back.. I would say it took me maybe 2-3 weeks to be completely comfortable. Everything from file creation to moving directories from one machine to another. Don't try to force yourself. Just learn at your own pace. Ubuntu is one of those systems where almost everything is already setup. When you are comfortable with Ubuntu try another distro that requires YOU to set stuff up. I recommend Arch for that kind of thing. When you boot the system, there is no graphics (the live disk anyway). Then you have to do EVERYTHING in CLI. What seems to help is just diving in. Doing everyday activities in the terminal. (moving, deleting, editing files. Reading email *text only*. Installing / upgrading software. )
You are so helpful and encouraging. Thank you.
Phedup
 
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V

Videodrome

Guest
Basically, learn Navigation, adding or deleting files, file permissions, and very importantly learn your Distro's Package Manager.

Be aware of the main branches of Linux that have different Package Manager systems for installing programs and dependencies. From my knowledge, these include Debian, RedHat, Slackware, and gradually Arch/Manjaro is getting more notice.
 

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