Learning To Build Desktop Environments

Alexzee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2019
Messages
3,602
Reaction score
1,918
Credits
21,280
@TuxBot can you direct me to where I could learn how to build or rebuild the XFCE desktop environment along with all of it's library's from source code?
 


@TuxBot can you direct me to where I could learn how to build or rebuild the XFCE desktop environment along with all of it's library's from source code?
For rebuilding the XFCE desktop environment from source code, you can follow the steps listed on their official website. Before you start, it's important to make sure that you have all the necessary dependencies installed on your system. Here's a sample command you can use to get started:
Code:
sudo apt-get build-dep xfce4
Once you have the required dependencies installed, you can download the XFCE source code from their official website. Extract the source code archive and navigate to its root folder using the terminal. From there, you can use the following commands to build and install the desktop environment:
Code:
./configure && make && sudo make install
Keep in mind that this may take some time as it involves compiling the source code. Also, ensure that you have read and understood the implications of building software from source code on your system.
 
@TuxBot the instructions you gave me are good for a Linux system that uses APT for it's command line utility.
I'm interested in learning how to build or rebuild a XFCE desktop environment on Slackare 15. Can you point to me the instructions for that?
 
@TuxBot the instructions you gave me are good for a Linux system that uses APT for it's command line utility.
I'm interested in learning how to build or rebuild a XFCE desktop environment on Slackare 15. Can you point to me the instructions for that?
Sorry about that! For Slackware 15, the process for building and installing a XFCE desktop environment will be a bit different. Here are the general steps:

1. Download the source code - You can download the XFCE source code from their official website or using a tool such as wget or curl.

2. Install dependencies - Ensure that your system has the dependencies required to build XFCE by running the following command:
Code:
sudo slackpkg install libgudev libwnck3 xfwm4 xfce4-session thunar-volman exo

3. Extract the source code - Extract the downloaded source code archive to a directory of your choice.

4. Configure the build - Navigate to the extracted directory using the terminal and run the following commands:
Code:
./autogen.sh
   ./configure --prefix=/usr
This will configure the build and set the installation path to /usr.

5. Build the source code - Run the following command to build the XFCE desktop environment from source:
Code:
make

6. Install the files - After the build is complete, use the following command to install the files:
Code:
sudo make install

Note: The above steps are just general guidelines and may vary slightly depending on the specific version of XFCE you are building and other factors. Be sure to consult any documentation provided with the source code for more detailed instructions.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any further questions.
 
One more question-
@TuxBot can I use a Slackware-current package, rebuild it and it be efficient enough to install on Slackware Stable?
 
One more question-
@TuxBot can I use a Slackware-current package, rebuild it and it be efficient enough to install on Slackware Stable?
Using a Slackware-current package on Slackware Stable is not recommended since Slackware-current packages are usually built with more recent libraries and dependencies that might be missing or incompatible in a stable release.

It's generally better to rebuild the package from source on your stable release of Slackware, in order to ensure maximum compatibility and avoid potential library conflicts.

If you do decide to try to install a Slackware-current package on Slackware Stable, you may experience issues such as broken dependencies, missing libraries, and incompatibilities. It's important to carefully review the package's documentation and dependencies before attempting to install it on a different release of Slackware.

In summary, it's recommended to rebuild packages from source, whenever possible, on your stable release of Slackware in order to ensure maximum compatibility, stability, and security.
 
Using a Slackware-current package on Slackware Stable is not recommended since Slackware-current packages are usually built with more recent libraries and dependencies that might be missing or incompatible in a stable release.

It's generally better to rebuild the package from source on your stable release of Slackware, in order to ensure maximum compatibility and avoid potential library conflicts.

If you do decide to try to install a Slackware-current package on Slackware Stable, you may experience issues such as broken dependencies, missing libraries, and incompatibilities. It's important to carefully review the package's documentation and dependencies before attempting to install it on a different release of Slackware.

In summary, it's recommended to rebuild packages from source, whenever possible, on your stable release of Slackware in order to ensure maximum compatibility, stability, and security.
Thank you @TuxBot you have been extreamly helpful.
I look forward to learning what you have posted for me.

I will keep this thread open as I may need your help in the not so distant future.
 
Thank you @TuxBot you have been extreamly helpful.
I look forward to learning what you have posted for me.

I will keep this thread open as I may need your help in the not so distant future.
You're welcome! I'm always here to help if you have any further questions or issues. Just tag me (@TuxBot) and I'll get back to you as soon as possible. Good luck with your Slackware and XFCE adventures!
 

Staff online


Latest posts

Top