Linux Newbie - Can't boot from USB

JMChamp

New Member
Credits
0
Hi Chris: Yes, Bios support is enabled under the Config arrow.

Hi Captain: I saw that update, too, and considered it, but I agree it may not be much use. Startup shows Boot, Network, Boot Mode (I've tried both 'quick' and 'diagnostics'), Option Keys Display, and Boot device List F12 Option (which is enabled for quick access to the boot order).
 

Attachments



wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,012
john still throwing ideas in:

1. there is supposed to be an always on usb port at rear, perhaps yellow, did you try that?

2. does it have the 5-in-1 card reader?

3. does it have

Optical drive
  • Ultrabay enhanced DVD/CD-RW combo drive
  • Blu-ray combo drive
  • Blu-ray burner
wiz
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,012
most of the .iso files we use in linux are referred to as hybrid iso - that means the same file can be burned to a usb stick, a dvd or even an sd card

i am thinking you could burn your .iso to a dvd, then go into F12 and choose to boot from the dvd ahead of hard drive, and install from there.

if that works and you want to keep the option then you can F2 to enter full setup and change the order permanently.

wiz
 

JMChamp

New Member
Credits
0
Do either of you think I can still go with a newer version of Linux using the DVD approach, or should I opt for something older? If so, is there one in particular that you could recommended given my CPU's specs?
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,012
mate best environment for linux is uefi-gpt, but bios-mbr such as you have, with 8 GB RAM and intel i5 dual-core should be fine for running a modern linux, eg LM 19.3

here's an article from ubuntu - it's 2011 but worth the read, bottom of each page links to the next

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition/PartitioningBasics

the article will give you an idea on partitioning under your environment - if you wanted to do it in advance, you would use GParted that is on the live medium you have burned, before you enter the installer.

however i would be inclined to go as auto as possible, let the installer do the work.

once you have a working linux on the ssd, then you can use gparted to provide space for the UMassLinux 18.1 to run as well.

cheers

wizard, and hi vrai ;)
 

Vrai

Well-Known Member
Credits
779
Do either of you think I can still go with a newer version of Linux using the DVD approach, or should I opt for something older?
With the specs you quoted you should be fine with any Linux distro.
I'm working with a brand new 256GB SSD. CPU is a Thinkpad T510 (circa 2010), 8GB RAM, Intel Core Duo i5, M540 @ 2.53GHz
I am running Linux Mint 19.3 on an Acer laptop with an Intel Core i5 6200, Intel Graphics 520, and 4 GiB of RAM. It runs perfectly! :)
 

jglen490

Active Member
Credits
656
And you did verify the .iso after download, correct?
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,012

JMChamp

New Member
Credits
0
7A9E54212433C8547EDFD789AC933C91A9BDE1A61196FA7977C5357A2C40292D

Looks like I have a match, so I guess that means the mystery continues!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,012
well i guess there is some good amongst the bad, you know you got a good download. :)

do you have a good friend or family member whereby you can take the stick an dvd and try them out?

it won't harm their computer

chris
 

zg_nico

New Member
Credits
0
Under "Security" I have the following menu options:
- Password
Sometimes when password is set, in bios showing additional options. Maybe you should set password (and remember it!), then reboot, again go to BIOS settings and look for a secureboot (or the same). To clear password you should set it again, for that enter that password witch you had set earlier and set empty string for the new password.
 

jglen490

Active Member
Credits
656
Thanks for replying.

Under "Security" I have the following menu options:
- Password
- Fingerprint
- Security Chip
- BIOS Update Option
- Memory Protection
- I/O Port Access
- Anti-Theft
If you go into the Security option in the BIOS screen, is there anything in the Security Chip option? Try to select it and see what it brings up.
 

JMChamp

New Member
Credits
0
If you go into the Security option in the BIOS screen, is there anything in the Security Chip option? Try to select it and see what it brings up.
I get a number of options, including:

Security Chips - active/inactive (current setting is active)
Security Reporting Options - Bios ROM, ESCD, CMOS, NVRAM, SMBIOS Reporting (enable/disable)
Clear Security Chip
Intel TXT Feature - enable/disable
 

jglen490

Active Member
Credits
656
Looks like a good place to start. I would start with a least disruptive setting. If you can set Security Chips to "inactive", I would start there, then Save the BIOS changes and reboot with the USB device attached.

The Clear Security Chip may be the end game, but I don't know if there may be unintended results.
 


Members online


Latest posts

Top