socket and ip addresses

TCRatius

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Hello Rob, Wizard and the rest of the gang,

You'll have to forgive me, been learning data science for the last year and what I've learnt is every fricken thing has a name and often many things have more than one name, and it annoys me, so if I don't name things correctly than try and get an idea of what I am saying.

Ok, so I decided to make a server using Debian 9 and it has Nginx, Postgresql, Rstudio-server and Shiny server to run shiny apps, why? cause I am slightly mental. For further information check out the awesome tutorial this guy from Peru made, fricken blows my mind;

RStudio-Server for Shiny Apps
https://community.rstudio.com/t/set...ver-rstudio-server-on-a-raspberry-pi-3b/18982 With the OS and servers, it only takes up 11GB and runs of 4volts! Well, I think that's cool.

Now I've installed all this as per the post about, literal did it about 3 or 4 times. I use my own IP range 10.0.0.x and port number. The Nginx server points to the Rstudio and Shiny Server, hmm just realised, I don't remember doing anything to direct Rstudio to Shiny. Anyway, IP addresses bug me, I feel really unsure if I'm doing the right things. For instance, Nginx needs loopback back address and different ports to point to the other servers, and I don't know why. Whereas, the others just point to the router 10.0.0.x/8. <-- see a thing like the 8 on the end, bug me I want to know why, plus I would have thought they'd have there own IP address.

My main goal is to eventual appreciate and use concepts given in the Complete Nginx Cookbook, write my own bash scripts etc. I am willing to take the time and I understand that there is a truckload of information out there, yet the information goes from being straight forward to really technical quickly. So how does one learn about Linux servers and layering, IP address and all, I just feel like I am alone hacking away at this stuff with no direction and no one to turn to when I am unsure and even a book could be helpful compared to my current methods?

In any case, if you can think of something to help me understand this concept more thoroughly, well, that would be mighty helpful.

Cheers TC

Ps, to top it all off, I can't even get the shiny app to load. It's just so different from what I've been learning yet interesting.
 
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wizardfromoz

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Hello again, Little Mouse :)

I am moving this to General Server, where it might attract the audience you seek.

Also pinging @Rob , @JasKinasis and we have new Members including @9daemon who might have expertise in this area :D

Me, I am just an old fart who is legend in multi-multi-multi-mutli-booting, and OK with troubleshooting and adore Timeshift :rolleyes:o_O

But I will watch with interest.

Good Luck

Wiz
 

TCRatius

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Cheers Wizard, I've taken 3months off from uni as it's honestly tough doing a stupid masters of data science when you haven't done a bachelor of computer science or work in the industry, plus this subject was learning piece of crap Tableau and I'd happily never get my degree finished if I never have to go near that crap. Anyway give me time to alter my post, it's a little dodgy grammar-wise.

My plan is to set up opencart and offer my services to the local bike shop in exchange for some new tires and tubes.

Btw, I bought Rob book, very helpful but I was hoping it was going to be autographed :)
 

9daemon

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I've learned a lot about networks from different sources. I'm by no means an expert, but I know a thing or two. one of the first things I read was tcp/ip for dummies. I forget who writes it. learning about tcp/ip will really help you understand networking better. another good one is the network+ course on https://cybrary.it.
the "/8" on the end is called CIDR (classless inter-domain routing) notation. for example 192.168.1.0/24 is a network with 254 available IP addresses in it, 192.168.1.0-192.168.1.254. this is the typical size of a home network. I remember /24 because I use it a lot and honestly can't remember how you get the number based on how many ip's there are. I know /32 is a single ip. I'm not sure the exact number of available addresses in a /8 but it would be a lot. probably only assigned to a large organization or ISP.
Just looked up CIDR to jog my memory. The /24 is the number of leading 1 bits in the IP address, and translates to a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. You need to understand how to convert between binary and IP to completely understand this.
 
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TCRatius

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Cheers for that @9daemon, I'll look into this networking for dummies, sound like the perfect thing for me. :) and will check out the cybrary.it.

The 10.0.0.0 - 10.0.0.254 was just given to me when I signed up with my internet. I heard through the grapevine that 10.0.0.x was made because they thought they would run out of IP addresses using 192.168,x.x, yet in my case I notice the neighbours use a mix of both. The example online used the 10.0.0.0/8, yet most often used 192.168.0.0/24. Interesting to note there is a purpose for this slashed digit.
 

wizardfromoz

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I've had all sorts of books For Dummies and made good use of them .... hhmmm, let me re-think my position there

Wiz
 


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