Technologies We Grew Up With That are Now Obsolete

Quote "(HINT: Do NOT buy electronics sold by Walmart. Many of them are house brands with no documentation, no contact, and no warranty. The actual "warranty" is the 90 day Walmart return period. If it dies on the 91st day, Walmart will do nothing, and there is no recourse.)"

Don't the US have a Consumer Guarantees Act??
When I buy anything from Walmart I buy the warranty contract only cost $4.00 to $6.00 on the stuff I buy floor fans and table fans.
When it breaks or stops working I talk it back to Walmart and with my warranty contract and I get a new product or a full refund.
If you buy anything at Walmart that can beak or stop working buy the warranty contract well worth the $4.00 to $6.00 cost.
Personally I hate Walmart and everything about them however they have stuff in stock when no one else does.
 


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SMH the days of a contract based on a hasndshake are LONG gone lol

This law was likely created because people didn't adhere to said handshake contracts.

Laws like this don't exist in a vacuum. They're there to protect the consumer. If we go back to when laws like this were enacted, there were some flimsy consumer protections and many shady people who took advantage of that.

Hmm... This has the potential to turn political, so let's avoid that. I will say that it's an interesting subject to look up and learn about. A handshake, with an agreement, can actually be considered a contract in some circumstances. (That's here in the US. I do not know about laws elsewhere.)

(I spent two summer semesters taking business law classes as I figured it would be helpful.)
 
This law was likely created because people didn't adhere to said handshake contracts.

Laws like this don't exist in a vacuum. They're there to protect the consumer. If we go back to when laws like this were enacted, there were some flimsy consumer protections and many shady people who took advantage of that.

Hmm... This has the potential to turn political, so let's avoid that. I will say that it's an interesting subject to look up and learn about. A handshake, with an agreement, can actually be considered a contract in some circumstances. (That's here in the US. I do not know about laws elsewhere.)

(I spent two summer semesters taking business law classes as I figured it would be helpful.)
Exactly my point bro.
I remember my grandpa talking about the fact that all the business he did was with a handshake, but that was when people placed value on their word, and "integrity" actually meant something.
 
I remember my grandpa talking about the fact that all the business he did was with a handshake, but that was when people placed value on their word, and "integrity" actually meant something.

I don't expect it has been quite that rosy for a long, long time - outside of the rural areas.

Hmm... I guess it'd be anthropology (and not politics) to speculate that this was a byproduct of larger populations/population density.

It's a lot easier to lack integrity when you're not a member of a small community, a community where everyone knows everyone and knows those who are not honest.

That'd be my speculation.

I live in a very, very rural area. You can trust someone who says they're going to do something. Those that don't are weeded out fairly quickly. For better or worse, at least here in the US, we've crossed the threshold and more people live in urban areas than live in rural areas.

I have a thing where I'll loan almost anyone $20, no questions asked - other than when they will repay me.

If they don't pay me back, I make it a point to remark on that every time I see them. I especially enjoy remarking on it when they're surrounded by their friends and family.

I figure it's worth $20 to learn that much about a person.
 
thank you for the laugh, I can't stop lol :D

It's a pretty successful strategy.

If it's someone who doesn't have the means to repay me, then I don't expect to be repaid. I'll then give them something, like money, but without expecting it to be paid back. Gifts are unconditional in my world.

I don't give someone something with the expectation they'll do something for me. That would be paying for a service or perhaps a loan.

It's a cheap way to find out what a person is really about.

Anyhow... We've veered quite a ways off topic.

To bring it back on topic...

Cars with large naturally aspirated engines and a clutch pedal, preferably with a gated shift lever.

I love modern technology. I love the DCT options we have today, but the big 12 cyl, with naturally aspirated and true manual transmissions, are pretty much behind us with Ferrari making just a few more in limited runs like the Daytona SP3.

So, if you're going to get one you can still pick up a late 70s Jag (like the XJS V12) for not a lot of money. Go through the engine and electrical system and you'll have a great weekend car that will give you a lot of fun. Many of those weekends will be trouble-free, assuming you maintain it properly.
 
The MiniDisc-Player, technology of the 1990s!
It was expensive, but had at this time much more appeal than any other mobile device for listening and recording of music. :cool:

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The MiniDisc-Player, technology of the 1990s!

There's a guy on YouTube called 'TechMoan'. He's great and has a bunch of videos on Mini Disk.
 
did anyone say bias ply tires? It's a good thing we're (more or less) done with those.
I always preferred Cross ply or Bias belted with chunky tread in snow and mud, they seemed to cut through it better than radials
 
The MiniDisc-Player, technology of the 1990s!
It was expensive, but had at this time much more appeal than any other mobile device for listening and recording of music. :cool:

$_86.JPG
The Transistor Radio, technology of the 1950s & 1960s!

https://www.collectorsweekly.com/uploads/2008/05/windsorselfixweb+240x161.jpg
 
The Transistor Radio, technology of the 1950s & 1960s!
I still have one.. it goes in my tackle box when i'm out for the day
 
I still have a couple of them I got at Christmas when I was a kid and still have the original boxes for them.
 
The Transistor Radio, technology of the 1950s & 1960s!

https://www.collectorsweekly.com/uploads/2008/05/windsorselfixweb+240x161.jpg
Oh yes, that was an exciting time, SONY was (1955) the first company in Japan to jump on this bandwagon, but the first company to start mass production (1954) was Texas Instruments. At first they called it "transistor radio", later the term pocket radio became more and more popular. But that also had something to do with the radio programs in Japan at the time, because people really wanted to hear mambo and this wave practically swept over the whole country. These little radios sold like hot cakes! :D

But these pocket radios are still available today for about $25!
 
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Hah I remember those, it was kind of high tech for that time!I even remember my first photo I did with it.I'll try finding it and posting it here!How do I upload images ?
I would just take a picture of it with my cell phone or digital camera.
Then load from either source using a cable to a folder or file on to my computer.
Then copy and paste it to a post or take a screenshot of it and paste it to a post.
 

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