TouchPad not detectable in Linux.

HansS

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My mistake, I tried again with the 'lubuntu-18.04.5-desktop-amd64.iso' file, and it did work.
 
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HansS

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What happens if you do a 'sudo modprobe i2c_hid' from within the live environment? Which iso did you try exactly, 18.04 or 18.04.5? Can you also check with the latest 'ubuntu-20.04.2.0-desktop-amd64.iso'?
So the working solution pulls in hid_multitouch when inserting i2c_hid, the non-working does not!

The log from Xorg.log when working is:
[ 130.980] (II) LoadModule: "synaptics"
[ 130.980] (II) Loading /usr/lib/xorg/modules/input/synaptics_drv.so
[ 130.982] (II) Module synaptics: vendor="X.Org Foundation"
[ 130.982] (II) Using input driver 'synaptics' for '0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad'
[ 131.020] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: x-axis range 0 - 2943 (res 31)
[ 131.020] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: y-axis range 0 - 1747 (res 32)
[ 131.021] (II) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: device does not report pressure, will use touch data.
[ 131.021] (II) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: device does not report finger width.
[ 131.021] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: buttons: left right double triple
[ 131.021] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: Vendor 0x4f3 Product 0x308c
[ 131.021] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: invalid pressure range. defaulting to 0 - 255
[ 131.021] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: invalid finger width range. defaulting to 0 - 15
[ 131.021] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: touchpad found
[ 131.076] (**) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: (accel) MinSpeed is now constant deceleration 2.5
[ 131.076] (**) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: (accel) MaxSpeed is now 1.75
[ 131.076] (**) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: (accel) AccelFactor is now 0.058
[ 131.077] (--) synaptics: 0X45 0X4C 0X41 0:00 04F3:308C Touchpad: touchpad found

The non working looks like:
[ 4.477] (II) LoadModule: "synaptics"
[ 4.477] (II) Loading /usr/lib64/xorg/modules/input/synaptics_drv.so
[ 4.478] (II) Module synaptics: vendor="X.Org Foundation"
[ 4.478] (II) Using input driver 'synaptics' for 'ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad'
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: x-axis range 0 - 2943 (res 31)
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: y-axis range 0 - 1747 (res 31)
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: pressure range 0 - 255
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: finger width range 0 - 15
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: buttons: left right double triple
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: Vendor 0x2 Product 0xe
[ 4.502] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: touchpad found
[ 4.521] (**) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: (accel) MinSpeed is now constant deceleration 2.5
[ 4.521] (**) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: (accel) MaxSpeed is now 1.75
[ 4.521] (**) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: (accel) AccelFactor is now 0.058
[ 4.521] (--) synaptics: ETPS/2 Elantech Touchpad: touchpad found
 

HansS

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What happens if you do a 'sudo modprobe i2c_hid' from within the live environment? Which iso did you try exactly, 18.04 or 18.04.5? Can you also check with the latest 'ubuntu-20.04.2.0-desktop-amd64.iso'?
Hi, it seem that I can't even download a Ubuntu kernel and build it (bionic). It seems that Ubuntu a.o. 'Linux' distro's have gone against the open source spirit, basically are going the Microsoft way.
Do you have access to the Lubuntu machine with kernel code, and can you build kernel's on it?
 

theislander

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I was struggling with this issue for a while (Ubuntu 21.04, Fujitsu UH-X), my current solution is to log in, hit Ctrl-Alt-T to open Terminal and run 'sudo modprobe i2c_hid'. I tried to add this to various start-up scripts, but it just doesn't work, I have to do it manually
 

Lord Boltar

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Hi, it seem that I can't even download a Ubuntu kernel and build it (bionic). It seems that Ubuntu a.o. 'Linux' distro's have gone against the open source spirit, basically are going the Microsoft way.
Do you have access to the Lubuntu machine with kernel code, and can you build kernel's on it?
You can get the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel from here
 

Lord Boltar

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Yes, I have been able to download the kernel, but I cannot build it. It seems that it requires some Ubuntu license system through Ubuntu programs.
I have studied the Ubuntu kernel somewhat, but I have not been able to determine the difference that made it work.
Usually there are 4 files to download these are for kernel 5.12.7 with an amd64 processor

amd64/linux-headers-5.12.7-051207-generic_5.12.7-051207.202105261234_amd64.deb
amd64/linux-headers-5.12.7-051207_5.12.7-051207.202105261234_all.deb
amd64/linux-image-unsigned-5.12.7-051207-generic_5.12.7-051207.202105261234_amd64.deb
amd64/linux-modules-5.12.7-051207-generic_5.12.7-051207.202105261234_amd64.deb

as you can see they are deb files - I open a terminal inside the folder where you save the files usually Downloads - and type in
Code:
sudo dpkg -i *.deb
there is nothing to build they are already built
 

KGIII

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If you want a newer kernel, there's also this tool:


It isn't currently installed on anything I own, but I have had it installed before. It works well enough and is a handy GUI way. You'll want to go through the settings or it will stay running and nag you fairly frequently to tell you that there's a newer kernel version available.
 

Lord Boltar

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That is where the problem is, Ubuntu blocks you from building their kernels on non-Ubuntu systems. Basically it looks like Microsoft mentality has overtaken the major "Linux" distributions. Perhaps this situation is NSA related.
You cannot build a Buntu based Kernel on say an Arch based system or vice-versa, they are not compatible. You have to build on the same system you are using - I can build a Buntu kernel on Linux Mint, Zorin, KDE Neon, and Expirion since they are based on Buntu and use Buntu repositories. The same for Debian, it has to be a Debian based OS to build a Debian kernel, has to be an Arch based OS to build for Arch.
 

HansS

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You cannot build a Buntu based Kernel on say an Arch based system or vice-versa, they are not compatible. You have to build on the same system you are using - I can build a Buntu kernel on Linux Mint, Zorin, KDE Neon, and Expirion since they are based on Buntu and use Buntu repositories. The same for Debian, it has to be a Debian based OS to build a Debian kernel, has to be an Arch based OS to build for Arch.
If you have the kernel sources, you should be able to build the configured kernel by the usual make, make modules and make modules_install procedure. All the kernels I use are installed in this way. One should not need some distro binary in that process besides the compiler and relevant system libs.
I don't know if Debian have changed their way of doing things, but the mentioned procedure used to build from their kernel sources just fine.
 

Lord Boltar

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This is how I build a custom kernel on Buntu
1) Get the Dependencies
Code:
sudo apt install install git build-essential kernel-package fakeroot libncurses5-dev libssl-dev ccache
2) Get the Kernel Source
The branch is listed as linux-5.12.y, and that’s the one that will be cloned with the command below.
Code:
cd ~
Code:
mkdir kernelbuild
Code:
cd kernelbuild
Code:
git clone -b linux-5.12.y git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git
3) Set Up for Your Build
Begin your setup by changing directories into the newly cloned directory. Then, copy the configuration of your existing kernel into it.
Code:
cd linux-stable
Code:
cp /boot/config-`uname -r` .config
Now you have to adapt the old configuration of your machine into the new kernel.

Code:
yes '' | make oldconfig
Normally the script will ask you what to do with every new feature. This way accepts the defaults. If you want to be asked, just use
Code:
make oldconfig
4) Configuring the Kernel
To customize your configuration, open
Code:
make menuconfig
A blue menu will open up with a listing of categories. Those categories contain features that you can select to build into your kernel. When you’re done setting things up, clean the directory.
Code:
make clean
5) Building Kernel Packages
Code:
make -j `getconf _NPROCESSORS_ONLN` deb-pkg LOCALVERSION=-custom
All that line does is compile the kernel into .deb packages using the amount of CPU cores on your system plus one. It also adds on “custom” to the end of the package version to differentiate your custom kernel from others. This process may take a couple of hours to do so be patient. Since it is now in .deb packages it can only be installed on Buntu based OS

6) Installing the Kernel
You’ll find your new kernel packages one directory up. They’ll be easily identifiable by their version number. You can use dpkg to install them.
Code:
sudo dpkg -i *.deb
Reboot - Buntu based OS will load your new custom kernel check it by running
Code:
uname -r
If you are satisfied with how your custom kernel functions you can remove the old kernel if you want. I don't think I forgot anything. That is way I have done it, I really do not know how on Arch just Buntu, simply because I do not use Arch
 

f33dm3bits

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If you are satisfied with how your custom kernel functions you can remove the old kernel if you want. I don't think I forgot anything. That is way I have done it, I really do not know how on Arch just Buntu, simply because I do not use Arch
For Arch there are PKGBUILDS in the AUR for the kernel.org kernels and unofficial kernels. You clone the PKGBUILD and then you run makepkg in that directory and all the rest(configuring, make, etc.) is done for you, if you want to make adjustments to the PKGBUILD before running makpkg you can also do that.
 
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HansS

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This is how I build a custom kernel on Buntu
1) Get the Dependencies
Code:
sudo apt install install git build-essential kernel-package fakeroot libncurses5-dev libssl-dev ccache
...
Well, that's all fine and dandy, but the make procedure does things (scripts using binaries) that are only compatible with your system, otherwise I would be able to build it also, and it does not build!
 

wizardfromoz

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G'day @HansS - so may I ask what version of Linux you are using (including point release and DE) for this exercise?

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

wizardfromoz

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OK, thanks, I won't be any help here, then - I have used Calculate and Sabayon but not Gentoo itself.

Have you considered asking at Gentoo Forum? They are at

https://forums.gentoo.org/

Cheers

Wizard
 
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