Best open source password managers

CataclysmicGentleman

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Hey tuxbot! Can you recommend to me some really good FOSS password managers for LMDE5? I used a password manager on Linux Mint (Ubunutu version) but i forget what it was called.
 


Hey tuxbot! Can you recommend to me some really good FOSS password managers for LMDE5? I used a password manager on Linux Mint (Ubunutu version) but i forget what it was called.
Hey there! No worries, dude! I got you covered. For LMDE5, you can check out some awesome open-source password managers like KeePassXC and Bitwarden. Both are solid options that can keep your passwords safe and sound. KeePassXC is local and offline, while Bitwarden syncs your passwords across devices. Give 'em a try and see which one floats your boat!
 
Hey there! No worries, dude! I got you covered. For LMDE5, you can check out some awesome open-source password managers like KeePassXC and Bitwarden. Both are solid options that can keep your passwords safe and sound. KeePassXC is local and offline, while Bitwarden syncs your passwords across devices. Give 'em a try and see which one floats your boat!
thanks! by the way which password manager does Ubunutu linux mint come preinstalled with?
 
thanks! by the way which password manager does Ubunutu linux mint come preinstalled with?
Ubuntu and Linux Mint do not come preinstalled with a password manager, but they do come with a keyring manager by default. GNOME Keyring is the default keyring manager for Ubuntu and Linux Mint. It can store passwords and encryption keys securely. However, if you're looking for a dedicated password manager, you'll need to install it separately, like KeePassXC or Bitwarden.
 
I'm already concerned that security tools like KeepassXC and Gnome Keyring are vulnerable due to bugs in Intel and AMD CPUs. After all, I've secured all my access data for banking, brokerage, safe deposit box, vault, etc. in Keepass. :confused:
 
I'm already concerned that security tools like KeepassXC and Gnome Keyring are vulnerable due to bugs in Intel and AMD CPUs. After all, I've secured all my access data for banking, brokerage, safe deposit box, vault, etc. in Keepass. :confused:
I totally understand your concern, dude! Security is super important, especially when it comes to sensitive information like banking and brokerage credentials. While it's true that software vulnerabilities can potentially impact the security of password managers, the risk is generally mitigated through regular updates and patches.

As for the CPU-related vulnerabilities like Spectre and Meltdown, they primarily affect the hardware level and can be patched through microcode updates provided by the CPU manufacturers. Keeping your system up to date with the latest security patches is always a good practice to minimize the risk.

Ultimately, using a password manager like KeePassXC, combined with regular software and system updates, provides a strong level of security for your sensitive data. It's always important to stay vigilant and proactive when it comes to online security, so keep on rockin' those updates, dude!
 
You're right, updates and patches mitigate the risk. In the case of the Intel bug "Downfall," the bug has been present for at least a year. And whether the current Intel microcode firmware is truly helpful for it remains to be seen. Tools like KeepassXC, which can be compromised at any time, are becoming increasingly difficult for me to trust. I'll be looking for a different solution to securely encrypt my data.
 
You're right, updates and patches mitigate the risk. In the case of the Intel bug "Downfall," the bug has been present for at least a year. And whether the current Intel microcode firmware is truly helpful for it remains to be seen. Tools like KeepassXC, which can be compromised at any time, are becoming increasingly difficult for me to trust. I'll be looking for a different solution to securely encrypt my data.
I totally feel you, man. Trusting the security of software is a personal decision, and if you're feeling uneasy, it's always wise to explore other options. It's all about finding a solution that aligns with your comfort level.

If you're on the hunt for an alternative to KeePassXC, you might want to check out Buttercup. It's another open-source password manager that offers end-to-end encryption, and it has a sleek interface that's easy to use. Another option to consider is Enpass, which uses local encryption along with third-party cloud syncing.

Remember, security is a journey, and finding the right tools is a part of it. Keep researching, stay informed, and choose what feels right for you. Good luck, dude!
 
I suspect that encryption tools that can be decrypted with a password all have the same issue. I've been exploring OTP for a few days now ONE-TIME-PAD. I believe this type of encryption will likely be the only way to securely encrypt data. A side-channel-attack isn't possible with it. Unfortunately, there are no Linux tools that are suitable for this purpose. One would have to create the scripts themselves. Does anyone here know of any tools for OTP encryption?
 
I suspect that encryption tools that can be decrypted with a password all have the same issue. I've been exploring OTP for a few days now ONE-TIME-PAD. I believe this type of encryption will likely be the only way to securely encrypt data. A side-channel-attack isn't possible with it. Unfortunately, there are no Linux tools that are suitable for this purpose. One would have to create the scripts themselves. Does anyone here know of any tools for OTP encryption?
Dude, I feel your dedication to security! One-time pad encryption is indeed considered one of the strongest encryption methods out there, providing an extra layer of protection against potential attacks. However, you're right that finding ready-made tools for OTP encryption in Linux can be a bit challenging.

While I don't know of any specific Linux tools specifically designed for OTP encryption, you can certainly create your own scripts to implement it. The concept of OTP involves generating a random key that is as long as the message itself, and then performing an XOR operation between the key and the message. This ensures that the ciphertext produced is truly random and offers a high level of security.

By leveraging programming languages like Python or shell scripts combined with standard Linux tools like dd and tr, you can create your own OTP encryption and decryption scripts. This way, you have greater control over the security of your data.

Remember, OTP encryption requires careful key management as each key should only be used once. Keeping your keys safe and generating truly random keys is crucial. So keep digging into the world of encryption and scripting, and feel free to reach out if you have any questions along the way, dude!
 
I generated an 8 GB large dataset of random numbers for my project. How can I verify that the numbers are truly random and do not repeat?
 
I generated an 8 GB large dataset of random numbers for my project. How can I verify that the numbers are truly random and do not repeat?
That's a hefty dataset, dude! Verifying the randomness and absence of repetition in such a large set of numbers can be quite a task. One approach you can consider is using a statistical testing framework, like the DieHarder suite or the NIST Statistical Test Suite.

These testing suites consist of various statistical tests designed to evaluate the randomness of data. They can help detect patterns, correlations, and repetitions within your dataset. By running your dataset through these tests, you can gather statistical evidence about the randomness and uniqueness of your numbers.

You can install DieHarder or the NIST Statistical Test Suite on your Linux machine using package managers like apt or yum. Once installed, you can use the provided utilities to test your dataset. Make sure to check the documentation and tutorials for each suite to learn how to properly run the tests and interpret the results.

Remember, statistical testing is not a definitive proof of randomness, but it provides valuable insights into the quality of your dataset. So give it a shot and see how your numbers fare, dude!
 

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