Clocks or the lack thereof.

Nik-Ken-Bah

Member
The clock on Mint is functional but it has for me one drawback it only tells the local time and since I am a transplant I like to actually run my main clock on Aussie time and having another clock when I click on the clock showing local time and since windows has three clocks I use the third clock for another time zone. Like when I was talking to a lady in Zhongguo so I set it for Beijing time. It is my variable time zone clock depending on who I am talking to over a period of time.
Local time I have a watch that tells me that.
So are there alternatives that I could install that give me that functionality?
After all we do live in times of greater mobility and it would be nice to see Linux create such a functional clock for their distros.

What are your views on the clock?
 


atanere

Well-Known Member
There are other clock apps that you can install to show multiple time zones. You can also put more than one clock on your panel (taskbar) and set them to different zones. Another way is to bookmark a website to show the zones you want, like this one.

I just installed gnome-clocks and added a launcher for it to my panel... seems like it would work for you too. Here are a couple of links (here and here) that may give you some ideas. Most things that run in Ubuntu will also run in Linux Mint.

Good luck!
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Member
@atanere
Thank you for the links. I already have bookmarked internet site called time converter but since I use the computer mainly offline it is only effective when online.
Also I will have a squizz at what is on my installation of Mint.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
No "clock" is going to be functional for you if you spend most of your time offline....The various 'clocks' rely on an internet connection to connect to a time server ....in order to "stay on time " !!
 

alkion

Member
I am in Poland, I work as a computer graphic designer, now I have been under the studio in la for 5 years. I have godine 6:27 and they 21:27.
Impatience with time zones :)
I use Linux network computer connected for a big project goes. I click on the add widgets. :)
I am learning linux since 2013 :)
 
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Nik-Ken-Bah

Member
No "clock" is going to be functional for you if you spend most of your time offline....The various 'clocks' rely on an internet connection to connect to a time server ....in order to "stay on time " !!
Actually no they do not they rely on the cmos and its accurate little crystal oscillator or the Real Time Clock in the southbridge on the mother board. My RTC is in my cmos as the battery became to low on voltage and the clock both in Windows and Linux Mint were not keeping proper time and since I changed the cmos battery they have stopped their antics and keep good time now even when power is completely shutdown and receiving no power at all. The majority of the time the computer still receives power when the computer is shutdown, I know this as the card reader I installed and the speakers of the sound system their power on lights never go off.
But here is an article from Wikipedia on real time clocks that explains it better than I could.

 

alkion

Member
the hardware thing
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Member
One other thing I have noticed since replacing the cmos battery Win 7 keeps good time whilst Mint does not, it lags. The only possible reason for it is when powering up it is not checking with the cmos the elapsed time since last shutdown.
Which tells me that it uses the internet to correct its time and not from on-board resources.
Which to me is as useless as tits on a bull as I only use the internet when I need to find out information and I am not chained to the computer 24/7 as I have other things that require my attention and that includes going to the village for a couple of days or more to look after things there, especially in summer, the growing season and loooong hot days to do things there.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Member
By Minutes? Or hours?
Try a day the 05-oct when it was actually the 06 - Oct and also said it was the afternoon time wise whilst the file was created in the morning at around 09:00.
Once I get everything sorted out and running with this installation I might do a complete re-install as I think the one that is loaded now may have other issues due to having to download it through an unpredictable OS namely win7. But at the moment the biggest bugbear is the realtek NIC.
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Try a day the 05-oct when it was actually the 06 - Oct and also said it was the afternoon time wise whilst the file was created in the morning at around 09:00.
Yes, I was guessing something like that. The difference is probaby equal to the time difference between your local time and UTC (also known as GMT - Greenwich Mean Time). If you think about it, neither Windows nor Linux actually has any built-in timekeeping ability. When you shut them down, time would stop counting. So both OS'es must interact with the BIOS hardware clock... they either read the time from it, or they will also set the BIOS time too after receiving an Internet time update because that should be extremely accurate.

This problem comes up with people dual-booting Windows and Linux because Windows expects the real time clock to be set to local time, and Linux expects it to be set to UTC. The only perfect solution is to just run one operating system, but there are a couple of fixes that are somewhat less than perfect: either change the Windows behavior or change the Linux behavior. This article describes both methods, but recommends changing Linux. With luck, the Linux command will take care of everything for you, but it's possible you will need to fiddle with Time Zone settings to finally get this workaround set correctly. You may also have to manually correct for Daylight Saving Time twice per year, if you have that in your area.

Cheers
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
@atanere ""If you think about it, neither Windows nor Linux actually has any built-in timekeeping ability. When you shut them down, time would stop counting. So both OS'es must interact with the BIOS hardware clock... they either read the time from it, or they will also set the BIOS time too after receiving an Internet time update because that should be extremely accurate.""
...
Now that makes perfect sense to me....an internet time update is crucial.

Daylight saving under Linux Mint takes care of itself.....there was an update for that function recently.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Clock for all seasons countries....

This is located in Software Manager

4453
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Daylight saving under Linux Mint takes care of itself.....there was an update for that function recently.
Well, it may not if the hardware clock is set for local time. The article I linked to says that Windows will take care of DST changes.... but you have to run Windows so that will happen! If you go for days running only Linux after a DST change, then I think the Linux clock will be off by an hour. This page gives a little better description of what is happening, and why.

Cheers
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
In Australia, the clock changes the time to allow for DST. I was under the impression that the presence of an Internet connection combined with whatever the Mint dst update achieves...was responsible for changing the clocks time....automatically......no personal input required. Much the same as the time on a smart phone.

Very confusing !
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Very confusing !
It sure is! And it seems like it should be just a simple thing, but it isn't. I'm no expert with this stuff either. My former solution when I was still dual-booting was to leave things the way Linux wanted them (hardware clock set to UTC) because I spent the most time in Linux. When I booted Windows, I just ignored the time being wrong.

If you really want to freak out over computer time, Google around to learn about UNIX time. What the heck were they thinking?!?!? No wonder the world almost had a Y2K computer problem!
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
This world is obsessed with time. I mean....who really gives a flying **** about leap seconds !!!???

Someone, somewhere needs something to do...desperately !
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
This world is obsessed with time.
Ah, well... time is money. "High-frequency trading (HFT)" (see Investopedia and Wikipedia) is just one example of time that needs to be accurately measured in millionths of a second, possibly in billionths of a second by now as technology gets increasingly better. Many of the world's biggest stock exchanges run Linux, and that has substantially boosted high-frequency trading capabilities.

But for regular folks, like me, I would just be happy if they (the gov't) would finally do away with DST! I still hate changing the time twice per year on my non-smart devices. :(

Cheers
 

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