How can I remember all the commands in the Python3 OS Module.....?

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blackneos940

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It just seems like there's so MANY..... :( I have a good grasp on Python in general, but....... I dunno...... :( Thanks for any help guys....... :3
 


It just seems like there's so MANY..... :( I have a good grasp on Python in general, but....... I dunno...... :( Thanks for any help guys....... :3
You aren't meant to! Perhaps @DevynCJohnson can point out some good reference materials you can keep handy online or in print format that you can refer to while programming and learning. The more you use the Python3 OS Module, the more you will remember the features you commonly use. This is true for any programming language, or the options for many Linux tools.

I was told that Einstein once said, "Genius is not knowing everything, but knowing where to find it!"

Good luck!
 
It just seems like there's so MANY..... :( I have a good grasp on Python in general, but....... I dunno...... :( Thanks for any help guys....... :3

Most of them you will not need to have memorized until a time comes when you specifically need them. The main ones you will want to remember are os.subprocess(), os.name, os.chdir(), os.getlogin(), os.uname(), os.read(), os.write(), os.open(), and os.system(). The os commands for directory and file manipulation are self-explanatory such as os.rmdir(), os.rename(), etc.

In my opinion, the best way to learn a programming language is to use it and then learn the nitty-gritty as you go. As long as you understand the basic syntax ad logic, that is good enough.

https://docs.python.org/3.4/library/os.html
 
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You aren't meant to! Perhaps @DevynCJohnson can point out some good reference materials you can keep handy online or in print format that you can refer to while programming and learning. The more you use the Python3 OS Module, the more you will remember the features you commonly use. This is true for any programming language, or the options for many Linux tools.

I was told that Einstein once said, "Genius is not knowing everything, but knowing where to find it!"

Good luck!

I guess so..... :) Weird.... :( I was stuck on Italics a moment ago....... :) I like that quote....... :3 Say!..... What if I made sl in Python.....? :D I'm not good at ASCI Art, but I can just Copy and Paste the Train from there into the Program..... :3
 
Most of them you will not need to have memorized until a time comes when you specifically need them. The main ones you will want to remember are os.subprocess(), os.name(), os.chdir(), os.getlogin(), os.uname(), os.read(), os.write(), os.open(), and os.system(). The os commands for directory and file manipulation are self-explanatory such as os.rmdir(), os.rename(), etc.

In my opinion, the best way to learn a programming language is to use it and then learn the nitty-gritty as you go. As long as you understand the basic syntax ad logic, that is good enough.

https://docs.python.org/3.4/library/os.html
That makes sense now that you mention it..... :) Learn it as I go....... Maybe baby steps.....? :3 Also, I know that site.....! :D Maybe I should go there more OFTEN..... :)
 
Most of them you will not need to have memorized until a time comes when you specifically need them. The main ones you will want to remember are os.subprocess(), os.name(), os.chdir(), os.getlogin(), os.uname(), os.read(), os.write(), os.open(), and os.system(). The os commands for directory and file manipulation are self-explanatory such as os.rmdir(), os.rename(), etc.

In my opinion, the best way to learn a programming language is to use it and then learn the nitty-gritty as you go. As long as you understand the basic syntax ad logic, that is good enough.

https://docs.python.org/3.4/library/os.html
But why does os.name call GNU/Linux "Posix".....? :<
 
Ohhh..... :3 Ok..... :D I don't quite know what Posix even MEANS..... :) Thanks for the link, good sir!..... :3

POSIX is a set of standards just as UNIX is a set of standards. If a system satisfies the UNIX standards, then it is a Unix operating system. Solaris, QNX, and OS X Yosemite are 100% POSIX-compliant, thus they are POSIX systems. Linux, Minix, FreeBSD, Haiku, and other operating systems are nearly POSIX-compliant. Therefore, Linux is considered a "mostly POSIX-compliant" system or a POSIX-like system.
Helpful links
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POSIX
http://www.linux.org/threads/linux-standard-base-lsb.5113/ (LSB is another important standard)
 
POSIX is a set of standards just as UNIX is a set of standards. If a system satisfies the UNIX standards, then it is a Unix operating system. Solaris, QNX, and OS X Yosemite are 100% POSIX-compliant, thus they are POSIX systems. Linux, Minix, FreeBSD, Haiku, and other operating systems are nearly POSIX-compliant. Therefore, Linux is considered a "mostly POSIX-compliant" system or a POSIX-like system.
Helpful links
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POSIX
http://www.linux.org/threads/linux-standard-base-lsb.5113/ (LSB is another important standard)

Huh..... :) I didn't know all of that....... :) Or, at least, MOST of it..... :3 So, is that also why Richard Stallman calls it "Unix-LIKE".....? :3 Also, I LOVE the OSX KDE Window Decorations..... :3 Also, I'm wanting to update my Kernel on my Chromebook, but how do I ensure the Touchpad will WORK......? :( It never detects it, and I have to revert to the previous Kernel version..... :( Isn't that a security risk.....? :(
 
Huh..... :) I didn't know all of that....... :) Or, at least, MOST of it..... :3 So, is that also why Richard Stallman calls it "Unix-LIKE".....? :3 Also, I LOVE the OSX KDE Window Decorations..... :3 Also, I'm wanting to update my Kernel on my Chromebook, but how do I ensure the Touchpad will WORK......? :( It never detects it, and I have to revert to the previous Kernel version..... :( Isn't that a security risk.....? :(

Yes, that is why Richard Stallman says "Unix-like".

It is not a security risk to use the previous kernel due to driver incompatibilities.
 
I understand as if the system was certified as Unix, i.e. people had money and desire to buy the name Unix, it is called so. I'm pretty sure that GNU/Linux and BSDs are much more Unix than OS X (I never used OS X, but looking at how they install applications, how many times they refer to a terminal, gosh, how many people know that there is a terminal there, I think it's true; BSDs are even current descendants but they are only Unix-like) but the last one holds the name because Apple have money to buy everything (except for people that can make iPhone call:p).

Even Dennis Ritchie put GNU/Linux in the same box with Unix http://www.linuxfocus.org/English/July1999/article79.html

My two cents
 
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Yes, that is why Richard Stallman says "Unix-like".

It is not a security risk to use the previous kernel due to driver incompatibilities.
I thought so..... :) So, if not the earlier Kernels, what would make a particular GNU/Linux system VULNERABLE.......? :) Would it be if one never updated ANY part of their System.....? :3
 
I thought so..... :) So, if not the earlier Kernels, what would make a particular GNU/Linux system VULNERABLE.......? :) Would it be if one never updated ANY part of their System.....? :3
After a lot of time, when the software becomes old and out-dated, then security problems may very likely arise.
 
Neos - There are a few Linux distros available, like Damn Vulnerable Linux which deliberately contain outdated software with shedloads of unpatched vulnerabilities. Distros like this aren't for general day to day usage as they are far too insecure. But they are more useful in a lab setting, for learning ethical hacking.

e.g. Set up your own lab using a virtual machine (or a physical machine on your network) running Damn Vulnerable Linux and then use another machine running a different distro, like Kali; which has all the requisite tools for ethical hackers; and try to find and exploit the vulnerabilities in order to Pwn the vulnerable VM. Either by getting root access, or by crashing the machine, or reaching whatever other objectives you set out to achieve.

Typically there are many holes in these distros, allowing them to be attacked in a variety of different ways. These distros make it easy for would be ethical hackers/security bods to practice their craft safely and legally. And I'm sure shedloads of grey and black-hat hackers also practice/learn this way too!

Sometimes vulnerable distros are used as honey-pots on the internet, to try to attract the attention of black-hats, monitor their attack methods and catch them red handed!
 
Neos - There are a few Linux distros available, like Damn Vulnerable Linux which deliberately contain outdated software with shedloads of unpatched vulnerabilities. Distros like this aren't for general day to day usage as they are far too insecure. But they are more useful in a lab setting, for learning ethical hacking.

e.g. Set up your own lab using a virtual machine (or a physical machine on your network) running Damn Vulnerable Linux and then use another machine running a different distro, like Kali; which has all the requisite tools for ethical hackers; and try to find and exploit the vulnerabilities in order to Pwn the vulnerable VM. Either by getting root access, or by crashing the machine, or reaching whatever other objectives you set out to achieve.

Typically there are many holes in these distros, allowing them to be attacked in a variety of different ways. These distros make it easy for would be ethical hackers/security bods to practice their craft safely and legally. And I'm sure shedloads of grey and black-hat hackers also practice/learn this way too!

Sometimes vulnerable distros are used as honey-pots on the internet, to try to attract the attention of black-hats, monitor their attack methods and catch them red handed!
Whooo..... :3 Good idea!..... :D I have Wifite installed on this Chromebook, and I'm runnin' Enlightenment right now, 'cuz of, well, problems with KDE..... :(
 
After a lot of time, when the software becomes old and out-dated, then security problems may very likely arise.
I thought so..... :3 BTW, it's almost Easter!..... ^^ Hey, are ya gonna' watch the Blood-Red Moon tonight.....?? :3 I remember reading about that in Joel....... Spooky, but COOL!..... :> :D
 
I'm revisiting Python again because I want more computer skills. Someday, maybe I can try to get work on Freelancing sites. I'm also trying to come up with a strategy to learn this and put together reference material for myself because I'm not going to memorize all this.

So far, the best resource I've found is a free book site Invent With Python:
https://inventwithpython.com/

It has many examples of code in Python3 and does a break down of what parts of the program code do.

When I studied security and hacking in college, I created my own Hacker Cookbook cheat sheet of commands and procedures to set things up. I'll do something similar building notes for myself on this.
 


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