Linux Certificate

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clockshell

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Hey guys!

I hope you can help me.

I decided I want to go Linux more professionell and get certificated for it is useful to get a related job. So far I stumbled over http://www.lpi.org/ and http://www.linuxfoundation.org/ but I don't have any experiences nor references wich one is really acknowledged in the market.

Do you have any suggestions or do you even work in a sysadmin/engineer related space and can you give me some hints and tips? I'd be very glad :)

Have a nice evening!
 


The Linux Foundation certification program is brand new... so I don't know how much respect it will get in business/industry. I took their Introduction to Linux course and it was not too difficult, and therefore probably not a lot of value as a credential (even if you paid $250 for the "certified" version). I also have a Linux+ cert from CompTIA... because my work paid for the class and exam even though I didn't need Linux skills for my job. I have some low level Microsoft certs as well. I don't think any of these are very useful to get or keep a job.

Advanced certification may be another story altogether. If you had RHCE, or some specialized training, like in Linux security, that may well be more marketable. But getting advanced and specialized training will likely be very costly. My advice would be to pursue a university degree in computer science, and try to find all the work you can actually working with Linux servers and systems, even if volunteer work to start. I really think university credits are more valuable than crash-course certification programs. Just my opinion though.

As you work with real systems, you will get that hands-on knowledge that is also very valuable. And that may prove to be your best ticket into the job market. Some companies have pratical exams, or their interview process will screen you out quickly if you don't really know what you're talking about. Jump in with both feet and learn!

Best of luck to you!
 
Hey guys!

I hope you can help me.

I decided I want to go Linux more professionell and get certificated for it is useful to get a related job. So far I stumbled over http://www.lpi.org/ and http://www.linuxfoundation.org/ but I don't have any experiences nor references wich one is really acknowledged in the market.

Do you have any suggestions or do you even work in a sysadmin/engineer related space and can you give me some hints and tips? I'd be very glad :)

Have a nice evening!

I am "Linux+" certified (plus 3 other certifications), and I strongly recommend certifications. You definitely want to thoroughly understand Linux before taking the test. You probably want to get a book or two (maybe even three ;)). This link is a good start for the Linux+ cert - http://www.linux.org/threads/linux-reading-guide.6035/
 
I hit a wall of frustration by not really getting anywhere with my Associates in Applied Science (Cyber Security). I have some tough decisions to make and very concerned about how much 2 more years of College/University could cost me.

A friendly PC Repair Shop is letting me intern for experience, so I'm thinking of doing that plus certifications. I just got my big ass Mike Meyers A+ book in the mail to get started.

After that, I'm curious how I should build on that if I want to work toward a Linux or UNIX(BSD) based career.
 
I got my job with a major industrial corporation almost 18 years ago with an AAS degree in electronics (not computer science). And I refer you back to my post above.

I might ask, "Who here has got (or kept) a GOOD job in IT due to their certifications?"

Advanced certs may be an exception... I can't speak to that. But I truly believe that a degree carries more weight in anyone's search for a good job. If an AS degree isn't getting you where you want to be, then a BS degree has a better chance (in my opinion) than a certification. Yes, two more years of study will cost more than a crash-course for a cert... but I think you get what you pay for sometimes. And crash-courses aren't cheap either, not if you're pricing Red Hat or The Linux Foundation.

On the other hand, as I mentioned above, your practical experience may carry more weight than any piece of paper. I know at least one person making a good living with no college and no certifications... he's good at cyber security and works for a major bank. He got there with practical experience and real knowledge. Use your internship!

After reading about Ubuntu's certification program, I wonder why they discontinued it after only 4 years?

Some certs may need to be "maintained" (or upgraded) to show proficiency with current technology. A university degree is yours forever, even if it is outdated.

Choose what's best for you. And I wish you the best!

Cheers!
 
Thanks for the feedback.

I do have good feelings about this internship and the owner is really nice. Once trained to a point where I show proficiency, he's mentioned he might hire me directly or pay me on a freelance basis. Anyway, it's something and it's free education for my labor.
 
Well,

Actually I'm working as a technical support for a company that's dealer from CA Technologies, In my first days as a technician I thought that certifications were the way to get a better salary and a better job, but just 6 months ago I got a new supervisor and he has a particular philosophy, for him is not important to get a certification,in fact it's more important to get a experience in what we do,but he also remains me that no matter what you do, if you enjoy what you are doing , you are going to be succeed.

He also said we can learn from internet then probably we are going to stay in some point that internet became useful and then we have to go to a Institute to get more knowledge.
 
Well.... I feel a little disappointed in the book I bought. I feel like it has to much filler content in describing things and just needs to get to the point. It's the All In One CompTIA A+ by Mike Myers and it's almost 1500 pages. It's hard to imagine if I need to remember everything thing in such a big volume.

I have heard good things about Exam Cram and wish I had gone with them instead. Anybody else use these books?
 

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