Today's thread is just about cleaning up unused kernels...

KGIII

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I don't do many RHEL articles. So, I did this one. I was just flipping through my notes and this one jumped out as a nice easy article to write.

You can clean up kernels quickly and easily in RHEL. I suppose you could also let them accumulate, but there's really no good reason to do that. You can do this programmatically, instead of removing them manually.


It's not a very complicated article, but it is an article.
 


Hmmm... considering that there is an actual need to remove old kernels from red hat, is this a problem (unwanted feature?) that is unique to red hat distros (because of easy and fast rollbacks maybe?) or is this something that is present in the wider Linux family?
 
RHEL already has that automatically configured in yum.conf, "man yum.conf".
installonly_limit
integer

Number of installonly packages allowed to be installed concurrently. Defaults to 3. The minimal number of installonly packages is 2. Value 0 means unlimited number of installonly packages. Value 1 is explicitly not allowed since it complicates kernel upgrades due to protection of the running kernel from removal.
This will remove old kernels and keep the number of configured kernels that you want to keep.
 
RHEL already has that automatically configured in yum.conf, "man yum.conf".

LOL I'd forgotten that, but it's okay. The article is still valid if you want to do it that way. It's all good.

Hmmm... considering that there is an actual need to remove old kernels from red hat, is this a problem (unwanted feature?) that is unique to red hat distros (because of easy and fast rollbacks maybe?) or is this something that is present in the wider Linux family?

Nah, it'll do it automatically though you can configure it how you want. See @f33dm3bits' comment above mine. You can still do it like this if you want.
 

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