Covid Corner

captain-sensible

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A quick update of situation in Essex UK ; wife and i are due a 2nd vaccination. Where we had it last time doesn't do it anymore, nearest centre is 23 miles away. GP stated they have no data nor idea where we can go reasonably for next vaccination
 


KGIII

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zantac heart burn medican was approve now look at all the damaged it has done. evern cigarettes are approved and look damaged that done
Of course there are potential bad outcomes. We operate with confidence levels. That doesn't mean bad things can't happen, it means we use the best data at the time (our best understanding) and make decisions based on that. I clearly explained this in the last post.

You can't logically make choices based on unknown outcomes. That's just silly because your making decisions on something that's unknown.
 

Condobloke

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YOUNG PEOPLE.......READ !!!!!!!


Respiratory specialist Lucy Morgan, who has been working on the frontline at Nepean and Concord hospitals in Sydney, described how young people develop "migraine-like" headaches and a cough so bad they can't walk or talk.

in particular :

"I know that some people are still worried about getting vaccinated so I wanted to share some stories with you about what it's like and how it feels to fall ill with COVID-19.

And my hope is that when we can understand a little bit more about how it feels to get sick with COVID-19 we might transfer some of our anxieties about the vaccine to feeling a bit more anxious about the illness and what we can do constructively to reduce our chances of falling ill with this.

Once you're exposed to virus, most of us have very, very few symptoms in the early days....they will be the ordinary cold and flu symptoms of headache, a bit of a sore throat, maybe a little bit of a cough. Some people have muscle aches and some people have fever in those early days. But some people become breathless and dizzy. And these are the sorts of symptoms that need urgent medical assistance.

If you have COVID-19, and you feel breathless, you have trouble breathing or you're feeling dizzy, you need to call an ambulance. An ambulance is free, your medical care will be free, and there will be people who can care for you even if English is not your first language.

The symptoms of COVID-19 that are affecting many of the patients that I've been caring for in the last few weeks include a really severe headache, not just a little bit of a headache but a really severe migraine-like headache that makes you sensitive to light, a stiff neck and takes more than just Panadol to relieve it. It's really awful.

Many of my patients have a terrible cough, the sort of cough that leaves you breathless and they can't move or speak or walk without the cough becoming really, really terrible. Lots of patients have diarrhoea. Lots of patients have nausea. They just can't eat or drink anything. And people feel so overwhelmingly fatigued, all they can do is lie on the bed.

Some of these patients become increasingly breathless. Initially, just breathless, walking quickly or making the bed, but as time goes by, they become breathless walking or even talking.

If anybody is at home with symptoms this severe, they need to call an ambulance. Don't ring up and make a GP appointment, call an ambulance. Because these are the sorts of symptoms and signs that tell me that the COVID-19 illness is progressing and progressing quickly.

As people become increasingly breathless, the oxygen in their blood starts to drop and they need increasing levels of extra support to keep those oxygen levels up. That might be oxygen via little nasal prongs that go into the nose but as the things progress and as people get sicker, they may need actually a machine to do the breathing for them.

One of the things that I noticed in my most recent days in the hospital was that the heartbreaking stories of patients who were very, very young. I've been looking after patients in their 20s, in their 30s and in their 40s.

Many of whom have very young children, many of whom have partners who are in hospital in other hospitals, dislocating their families. Many of these patients have children who have needed to be admitted to other hospitals so that there is someone who can care for them safely. All of them have extended families who have been impact in many, many ways by the impact of COVID-19 illness. Not one person that I was caring for with severe respiratory illness over the last few days was fully vaccinated.

This does not have to be you... two doses of COVID-19 vaccination will be your suit of armour. It will protect you from getting sick from COVID-19, from needing admission to hospital and from ending up in ICU. Protect your loved ones and protect yourself."
 

Condobloke

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MatsuShimizu

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COVID-19 hospitalizations in US hit 7-month high - ABC News

Arnold Schwarzenegger Slams Maskless Anti-Vaxxers - ET Canada

ET Canada (previously referred to as Entertainment Tonight Canada) is a Canadian entertainment news television series, using the same format as the American entertainment newsmagazine Entertainment Tonight. - Wikipedia

COVID vaccine mandates are here: Here's everything we know today - CNET
Summary from the CNET news above:
Members of the US military:

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III said in a memorandum on Wednesday that all service members of the Department of Defense will need to be vaccinated. The directive covers all members of the Armed Forces on active duty or in the Ready Reserve, which includes the National Guard.

Federal employees and onsite contractors:
In the coming days, it's expected there will be more vaccination mandates for other federal employees, Press Secretary Jen Psaki said during a White House briefing. However, which sets of federal employees will see mandates to be vaccinated haven't been announced yet.

Nursing home staff:
The Biden administration has imposed vaccine requirements for workers at nursing homes that serve people on Medicare and Medicaid.

Which states are banning proof of COVID vaccine requirements at the state level?
At least 20 states, including Arkansas, Florida and Texas, prohibit proof of vaccination requirements. That means businesses, schools and local government institutions cannot enforce a vaccine mandate (the same goes for requiring face masks). The prohibitions came into effect through either legislation or executive orders.

Are there any other organizations that can require COVID-19 vaccines?
Yes. Here are some businesses and organizations that legally can ask for proof of vaccination before allowing someone inside.
- Cruise lines
- Airlines
- Restaurants and bars
- Concert halls and event halls
- Health care facilities
- Employers
- Schools

Does Pfizer's full FDA approval extend to kids?
The FDA's approval of Pfizer and its partner, BioNTech, only applies to kids age 16-18. While Pfizer remains the only vaccine maker authorized for use in kids as young as 12 years old, the vaccine for that age group is still under emergency use authorization rather than total approval. This is because, among other factors, full FDA approval requires data on how the vaccine fares six months out, per NPR, and Pfizer's vaccine was only authorized for kids age 12-15 in May.

When can my child get a COVID-19 vaccine?
Kids age 12 and older have been eligible for the Pfizer vaccine since May. The FDA gave Pfizer emergency use authorization for kids age 12 to 15 after a clinical trial found the vaccine is safe and effective in that group. The other mRNA vaccine, Moderna, and the only single-dose vaccine on the US market, Johnson & Johnson, aren't available to kids yet.

My child has allergies, can they get the vaccine?
"If the child has a history of anaphylaxis or other severe allergies, then the observation time after the injection may be 30 minutes instead of 15," Liu says.


Can my child get the COVID-19 shot at the same time as other vaccines?
Yes, according to the CDC, your child may get other vaccines when they go in for their coronavirus shot without waiting 14 days between appointments.

Should we be worried about myocarditis?
Myocarditis and pericarditis, or inflammation in the heart, is a very rare side effect linked to Moderna and Pfizer vaccines mostly in males under 30 and following the second dose. After looking at data and weighing the risks and benefits, the CDC still recommends everyone, including children as young as 12, get vaccinated. According to a Washington Post report this week, the CDC and FDA are looking into Canadian data that suggests Moderna might carry a higher risk of myocarditis than Pfizer, mainly in young people.

My child can't be vaccinated yet. What should we do?
When spending time with other families with children, it's best if everyone continues to wear a mask, according to Harvard Health, and they should isolate themselves if there's an exposure. Additionally, choosing more outdoor activities and avoiding crowds, even when outdoors, can help protect your kids. Parents and older siblings who are vaccinated should also mask up to prevent breakthrough infections that can spread to vulnerable people who aren't as protected, including kids.

Track vaccines: https://covid19.trackvaccines.org/agency/who/

What you need to know about COVID-19 this week - DW News
Summary from the news link above:
- Australia sets COVID case record amid delta surge.
- Health officials in the US state of Tennessee said that children now accounted for 36% of the total COVID cases being reported.
- US carrier Delta Airlines will charge employees an additional $200 (Є170) every month for their company-sponsored healthcare plan if they choose not to get vaccinated against COVID.
- Japan said it will suspend use of 1.63 million doses of Moderna's COVID vaccine following reports of contamination, drugmaker Takeda and the Health Ministry said on Thursday.
- South Korea reported 20 COVID deaths on Wednesday, the highest daily count this year.
- New Delhi reported zero COVID cases for the fifth day in a row on Wednesday.
COVID-19 Statistic This Week - Reuters COVID Global Tracker

PS: I publish the post here earlier this week. I had other things to do later on today. I will post again here on Friday (US time: Fri, Sep 3, 2021, 07:00 PM) or Saturday morning Asia time. Thanks for reading everyone.
 

MatsuShimizu

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Delta variant hospitalizations make vaccine skeptics regret their decisions - DW News

COVID treatment and care at home: Compilation from from WHO, Business Insider and CNET
Tip: This article is written similar to Wikipedia. Links to the websites are listed at the end of this summary.

From WHO.INT [1]:
Q: What are the scenarios we are seeing where a person is being asked to care for themselves or take care of a COVID patient at home?
A:
1. When the health system is stretched. This happens when there, for example, is a sudden increase or surge in cases in the community, as we're seeing right now in many countries, and the bed capacity within the hospital is almost full or is full.

2. When patients test positive, however, they don't have any symptoms or they have very mild symptoms and they don't have any underlying diseases like cardiovascular disease or chronic lung disease and they're not elderly. So these people can be taken care of at home. However, they must importantly, first contact their health care provider for real time advice.

Q: In the scenario where you have a person who's infected with COVID at home, how do you keep them and yourself safe?
A:
1. The patient should stay in a separate room. If this is not possible, then they should have a designated part of the home and their movements around the house should be limited. Also, there should be kept one meter, at least one meter distance between them and anyone else.

2. It's critical to have good ventilation in that patient's room and any shared spaces. So this means to really have fresh, clean air coming through as much as possible. This can be done just by opening the windows. Unfortunately, though, it obviously needs to be safe to do so.

3. There should only be one person who is the caregiver for that patient and that caregiver should have no underlying condition.

4. Whenever patients receive care, they should wear a medical mask, as should the caregiver. And as soon as the caregiver leaves the room, they need to make sure to wash their hands.

5. The patients should have their own designated or personalized, if you want to call it that, dishes and cups, towels and bed linens. And these can be washed with soap and water at least once a day.

6. Any frequently touched surfaces by the patient have to be cleaned and disinfected every day and any waste generated from that patient should be packed safely.

7. Unfortunately, there should be no visitors allowed during the time that the patient is ill.

Q: Tell us about any signs or red flags which should tell a COVID patient or their caregiver at home that it's time to call the doctor or go to the health care facility.
A:
1. It is important to monitor the condition regularly. Ideally, this should be at least once a day for any signs and symptoms, complications or red flags, as you call them. And the important point here to note is that the flags can vary slightly depending on the age.

2. Signs and symptoms:
- For adults, these include the adults complaining of lightheadedness. They could be having shortness of breath, heavy breathing, complaining of chest pains, looking dehydrated.
- For children, it can often be them suddenly appearing confused, being off their food, having blue lips or face.
- For infants, or also known as babies, an inability for them to breastfeed. So in any of these cases, urgent care needs to be seen.

3. While at home, some patients may be asked to measure the oxygen saturation with a pulse oximetry. This is a medical device that monitors the blood oxygen level. It's a very useful device. However, it's important that the user has clear instructions on how to use it and also to know what is an abnormal reading or a normal measure. And when this happens, importantly, they need to urgently call their health care provider.

From WHO.INT [2]:
Q: Janet, please explain the treatment protocol for COVID care at home.
A:
1. The patient should be in isolation – meaning that we don’t want that patient to transmit the virus to other people.

2. You may have a fever. So, if you have a fever, you can take symptomatic treatments or antipyretics or drugs that reduce fevers to keep you comfortable.

3. Eat and drink sufficiently. So, make sure you stay hydrated, make sure that you maintain some good eating habits, eat what you like, but ensure to keep yourself well-nourished and well-hydrated.

4. Most patients who get COVID-19 will have no complications from it acutely. They may not develop severe pneumonia and may not need to go to the hospital and that's good. But we do know there are a few patients – mostly those who have risk factors for severe disease – these patients are at risk for developing severe disease.

5. So these patients, if they're being monitored at home, need to carefully watch your symptoms. There's one thing I do want to emphasize: SARS-CoV-2 we know is a virus. So, if you have COVID-19, then in patients that are being managed at home, we don't recommend the use of antibiotics. That means medicines that treat bacterial infections, because it's a virus infection so it won't respond to an antibiotic.

Q: We are seeing an increased demand of medicines like Remdesivir and also increased appeals for plasma therapy in the treatment of COVID-19. Please tell us what the evidence is telling us about the effectiveness of both Remdesivir and plasma therapy.
A:
1. At this moment in time, we have a recommendation against the use of Remdesivir for patients with COVID-19 because there was low certainty in the evidence that it had any benefit in mortality.

2. For convalescent plasma, we don't actually have a recommendation in that guideline specifically yet, but what we do have in the clinical management guideline is also against its use, unless under clinical trials as evidence is accumulating on those interventions. So we also do not recommend its use other than under clinical trials which are continuing and ongoing.

Q: How to monitor oxygen at home. What are the red flags? And also, please explain the wider red flags beyond oxygen when a person should get alert that now is the time to call your health care provider.
A:
1. The pulse oximeter can be used at home. Pulse oximeter is a simple device. It's a fingertip device that can just be a small device put on your index finger. It is relatively inexpensive and simple to use.

2. We do have a recommendation saying that if you are at home and especially if you're from a high risk group – so you're a person that may have the risk of developing severe disease – that monitoring your pulse ox, your oxygen saturation at home could be useful because you can detect, hopefully early, if your oxygen saturation starts to fall and then get the right intervention and care pathway started.

3. So 94 to 90 is a little bit low. However, it's not below 90 percent, which is the warning sign. So if your number is 90 to 94, then you have to make sure that you call your clinical provider and you tell them, this is my number, this is how I'm feeling.

4. What should I do? So, you can get some advice on what to do next. The warning symptoms to consider when you're at home are: shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. That can imply that you're having a pneumonia and the pneumonia is progressing.

5. Another one is chest pain. That can imply that your pneumonia is there and it's progressing. Another one is change in mental status. Sometimes that can be like confusion, like your thinking is unclear or that you're dizzy or that you're sleepier than usual.

Q: Can oxygen therapy be used at home?
A:
1. For an acute case of COVID-19 where we don't know if the pneumonia is going to be mild, if it's going to be severe, if you're going to progress to respiratory failure – that is the concern.

2. So, if oxygen is going to be used at home, it has to be done under a monitored setting, meaning that your clinician, under clinical supervision, that it's prescribed to you because oxygen is a medicine.

How to get at-home coronavirus tests, and how to use them correctly
From Business Insider [4]:
- At-home coronavirus tests are in high demand amidst the Delta surge.
- Most home kits are rapid antigen tests, which are quick and cheap but not as sensitive as PCR.
- PCR testing is the current "gold standard," which you can get delivered but it usually takes place in a lab.

You can buy rapid antigen tests in pharmacies
- Most of the over-the-counter, at-home testing options are rapid antigen tests, which can return results within 10 to 15 minutes. The Abbott BinaxNOW, Ellume Covid-19 Home, and Quidel QuickVue tests are among the most widely available rapid antigen tests authorized by the FDA. They're sold in most drugstores, including CVS, Walgreens, and Duane Reade.

- The majority of at-home antigen tests use some sort of nasal swab, and some of them come with an app or instructional video to walk you through the process.

You can get PCR and rapid tests delivered by Amazon, DoorDash, or a private lab
- Amazon has sold rapid antigen tests and at-home collection kits for PCR testing. At the time of publication, most or all of the antigen tests were listed as "currently unavailable" with no restock date.

- Home PCR test kits are more expensive than antigen tests, but they're also better at diagnosing COVID-19. Once you send away your nasal swab or saliva sample, you can expect results within one or two business days of the lab receiving your kit.



Antigen testing has its limitations
- Antigen tests aren't as sensitive as the gold-standard PCR test, which means you're more likely to get a false negative. Antigen tests work best for confirming that a symptomatic infection is COVID-19, so these are good ones to have on hand for the next time you feel sick. But if you're testing to rule out an asymptomatic infection, you may want to try a different option.

- Antigen tests work best for confirming that a symptomatic infection is COVID-19, so these are good ones to have on hand for the next time you feel sick. But if you're testing to rule out an asymptomatic infection, you may want to try a different option.

- While antigen tests screen for specific proteins in the coronavirus, PCR tests take a closer look for any trace of the virus' genetic material. The process usually takes place in a lab, but some test kits let you collect your own samples at home.

For more sensitive testing, get a PCR test and send your swab away
- Home test kit for PCR testing, is currently the "gold standard" for coronavirus diagnostics.

- Antigen tests screen for specific proteins in the coronavirus, PCR tests take a closer look for any trace of the virus' genetic material. The process usually takes place in a lab, but some test kits let you collect your own samples at home.

From CNET [4]:
What to know about both COVID-19 test kits delivered to your door through DoorDash
- There are actually two types of FDA-approved kits: One from Vault Health and one from Everlywell.
- Both kits contain polymerase chain reaction tests -- a molecular test that's considered one of the more accurate tests available.

About Vault Health test kit:
- Vault Health offers a saliva test kit.
- The companies promise to return test results within 24 to 48 hours.
- The kits may also qualify for reimbursement with health care insurance. For details, check out the CNET link [4] below.
- Vault Health's kit is a "remotely supervised video saliva sample collection with a Vault medical practitioner" that works for both symptomatic and asymptomatic testing. (Basically, you spit in a tube and mail it back.)
- The kit qualifies for same-day delivery through the DoorDash marketplace app or through Vault Health's website.

About EverlyWell test kit:
- Everlywell offers a nasal swab kit.
- Promise to return test results within 24 to 48 hours.
- May also qualify for reimbursement with health care insurance.
- Everlywell's kit is a lower nasal swab and also works for symptomatic and asymptomatic testing.
- The kit also qualifies for same-day delivery through the DoorDash marketplace app.

How to order a PCR COVID test on DoorDash
Via the Doordash app on iOS or Android. Read the CNET link [4] below for details.

Can I get a COVID-19 test delivered where I live?
- If you order through Vault Health or Everlywell, where you live doesn't really matter.
- But if you're ordering on-demand through DoorDash, the tests are available in at least 7 DashMart cities. Read the CNET link [4] below for details.

How do I know if my insurance will reimburse my at-home COVID test?
Vault Health and Everlywell are out-of-network with all health insurance plans and providers, according to their websites. This means they can't submit a claim for you or bill your insurance directly. However, both companies will provide a receipt that highlights the cost of your test, which you can then submit to your insurance company for reimbursement. The receipt should arrive immediately after you get your test results.

In addition, both Vault and Everlywell accept HSA and FSA funds to pay for your test.


What you need to know about COVID-19 this week: WHO Tracking New COVID-19 Variant Called Mu
From WebMD [5]:
- The World Health Organization is tracking a new COVID-19 variant called Mu, which could be able to evade the immunity provided by vaccines and prior infections.
- The variant, also known as B.1.621, was first identified in Colombia in January. It has now been detected in 43 countries and was added to the WHO’s “variant of interest” list on Monday.
- “The Mu variant has a constellation of mutations that indicate potential properties of immune escape,” the WHO wrote in its weekly COVID-19 update on Tuesday.
- Preliminary data suggests that the Mu variant may be able to evade antibodies at levels similar to the Beta variant, the WHO wrote, though more studies are needed.
The screenshot below is taken from who.int website. [6]


COVID-19 Global statistics this week - Reuters World Coronavirus Tracker And Maps


[1] WHO.INT - Episode 36 - Safe care at home
[2] WHO.INT - Episode 37 - Treatment and care at home
[3] Business Insider Sep 1 2021
[4] CNET Aug 29 2021
[5] WebMD Sept 2 2021
[6] WHO - Tracking SARS - CoV-2 variants

PS: I'll post here again on Friday evening (US) or Saturday morning (Asia), just like today. Thanks for reading everyone.
 

sam444

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Had my second Astra Zeneca vaccine yesterday.
First vaccine I had no side affects but with the second one I got a few side affects about 8 hrs later...headache, joint pain and fever...felt like I was getting the Flu. :eek:

Today with a few Paracetamol I feel much better, a small price to pay considering what covid would do, especially since I have asthma...I would be in the ICU or worse for sure.
 

Condobloke

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Drink plenty of water....staying hydrated seems to help.

I had my second AZ on 12th August, and the side effects hung around for a while. It shows the immune system is working, if nothing else.
 

sam444

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Drink plenty of water....staying hydrated seems to help.

I had my second AZ on 12th August, and the side effects hung around for a while. It shows the immune system is working, if nothing else.
I'll try that. :)

I wasn't going to get vaccinated because I was worried about getting blood clots and dying, but it seems to be a load of crap spread by the media as blood clots are more than likely caused by covid. :mad:

There's a chemist chain...I wont mention who (you know who you are) that wont let you in unless you answer medical questions even with a mask and have signed in...do you have a fever...cough...sore throat...are you waiting for a covid test result etc. The people asking the questions are sales staff with no medical qualifications who couldn't tell the difference between a covid cough or an asthma cough.


Their system doesn't work because people with covid just say no.
I wonder if fully vaccinated people have to answer their questions...I'll never know because we took our business elsewhere.
 
D

Deleted member 101831

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When we received our shots we were asked to confirm if all information was correct.

We were also asked if we have been around anyone recently who has tested positive for Covid.

No big deal to answer a few questions imo.
 

Condobloke

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This was drawn in 1919 by May Gibbs as part of the NSW Health’s response to the Spanish Flu outbreak.
Cecilia May Gibbs MBE was an Australian children's author, illustrator, and cartoonist. She is best known for her gumnut babies, and the book Snugglepot and Cuddlepie.
Just as relevant today.

image0.jpeg


Yes.....1919
 

sam444

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When we received our shots we were asked to confirm if all information was correct.

We were also asked if we have been around anyone recently who has tested positive for Covid.

No big deal to answer a few questions imo.
I didn't get my covid shots from that chemist, I got mine from my doctor. :)

Here in NSW Australia the police state, we've been in total lockdown for months and are not allowed any freedom. I'm not allowed to go 5km from my home...we have a curfew from 9pm to 5am...I must have on a mask and sign in where ever I go and many more rules too.
https://www.nsw.gov.au/covid-19/rules/greater-sydney
The police (SS) can stop me anywhere at any time and if I don't have a valid reason, I can be fined or arrested.


So you can imagine when a private company (chemist) makes up their own rules on top of all the other rules...to interrogate customers at the door, some people would object and go elsewhere.


I forgot to mention my side affects only lasted 36 hours but my doctor said it takes 2/3 weeks before I'm fully protected, I may still get covid (hope not) but I wont end up in the ICU. :p
 
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D

Deleted member 101831

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It doesn't appear to be getting any better here in the US due to the fault of the non-compliant folks who refuse to get vaccinated.

If people don't start complying the US may start mandating and enforcing rules.

I don't understand why some folks just refuse to do what is necessary to help get control on this Covid virus.

Majority of the complainers are the ones who are refusing to get vaccinated or wear a mask.

I'm glad you got vaccinated at least you're doing your part to help get a control on this Covid virus.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

sam444

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Here with all the rules we have in place, people still do the wrong thing.
Some people just don't give a stuff and because of them everyone else suffers.
People who are fully vaccinated will still be in lockdown and have to obey all the rules. o_O

I got my covid jabs, not because the Government told me to but because I didn't want to die from covid...just like I get the Flu jab every year. In 2017 3300 people died from influenza in Australia, the Government didn't mention that or make it compulsory to get a Flu jab.


I doubt the Government will force people to get vaccinated (I could be wrong) because at the end of the day we're all responsible for our own health.
 
D

Deleted member 101831

Guest
Here with all the rules we have in place, people still do the wrong thing.
Some people just don't give a stuff and because of them everyone else suffers.
People who are fully vaccinated will still be in lockdown and have to obey all the rules. o_O
Yep makes ya want to beat the hell out of non-compliant ones.

I got my covid jabs, not because the Government told me to but because I didn't want to die from covid...just like I get the Flu jab every year. In 2017 3300 people died from influenza in Australia, the Government didn't mention that or make it compulsory to get a Flu jab.
That's why we got our shots and we get flu shots every year for the same reason.

because at the end of the day we're all responsible for our own health.
And there is where the problem is.
 

MatsuShimizu

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Mu Covid Variant Reported In Nearly Every State - NBC News
Tip: For the full list of sources, check out the links are the bottom of this post.


From Business Insider [1]:
- The Mu variant has been detected in 47 US states and the District of Columbia, according to data from Outbreak.info.
- Only Nebraska, Vermont, and South Dakota are yet to detect a case, the data says.
- The strain is currently most prevalent in Alaska, where data suggests that 139 reported cases account for 4 percent of the total 3,837 sequenced samples.
- California has the highest number in terms of raw numbers, the data show, with 232 reported cases of the B.1.621 variant out of 139,930 sequenced. This accounts for less than one percent of those sampled.
- The Mu variant accounts for fewer than one percent of total COVID-19 cases, with the Delta variant dominant in the US.
- "This variant has a constellation of mutations that suggests that it would evade certain antibodies, not only monoclonal antibodies but vaccine- and convalescent serum-induced antibodies," Fauci said during a COVID-19 press briefing on Thursday. "But there isn't a lot of clinical data to suggest that. It is mostly laboratory in-vitro data," he added.


What to Know About COVID Viral Load
Source, WebMD [2]:

Q: What Is Viral Load?
A: It’s simply the amount of virus doctors can find in your body. They might use blood, nasal swabs, or other bodily fluids to test the load for a particular virus. People infected with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 may have different viral loads. This goes for people who aren’t unvaccinated, as well as “breakthrough infections” that affect those who are.

Q: Does a Higher Viral Load for COVID-19 Make You More Contagious?
A: Doctors aren’t sure. Some studies seem to show that it does, but others seem to show less of an effect.

Q: Could Exposure to a Higher Viral Load Make You Sicker?
A: The short answer seems to be yes. The seriousness of symptoms from viral infections is often due directly to the amount of the virus that gets into your body.

Q: Does a High Viral Load Mean You’ll Definitely Get Sick?
A: Not necessarily. Some studies seem to show no difference in viral loads when they compare infected people with symptoms to infected people without symptoms.

Q: How Do You Get Exposed to a High Viral Load?
- It’s more likely if you’re physically close to someone who is both infected and in the first 5 days of symptoms. Doctors, nurses, and other health care workers are at especially high risk when they deal with people hospitalized for COVID-19.
- Your risk might also be higher if you’re caring for loved ones sick with COVID-19.
- And it may not be just one-time exposure to high viral loads that are problematic. Animal studies show that repeated exposure to low viral loads can be just as infectious as a single high dose

Q: How Does Vaccination Affect Viral Load?
A: If you’re vaccinated, you’re far less likely to get COVID-19 from someone else, no matter the viral load of the infected person. In the uncommon instances that a breakthrough infection happens, your symptoms are likely to be far less serious. You may even have none.

Q: What’s the Best Way to Protect Against High Viral Load?
- The best thing is to avoid infection altogether. That way you’re less likely to get sick and less likely to pass COVID-19 to others. Remember, COVID-19 can cause serious and even life-threatening illness.
- By far the best way to avoid infection is to get vaccinated. It provides excellent protection both against infection and against the most serious aspects of the illness.

High Viral Load in Lungs Drives Fatal COVID-19 - WebMD
From WebMD [3]:
- A high amount of coronavirus in the lungs is a major contributor to death in COVID-19 patients, new research shows.
- On average, patients who died had 10 times the amount of virus in their lower airways than those who survived their illness.
- "Our findings suggest that the body's failure to cope with the large numbers of virus infecting the lungs is largely responsible for COVID-19 deaths in the pandemic," said lead study author Dr. Imran Sulaiman, an adjunct professor in NYU Langone Health's department of medicine.
- There was no evidence of secondary bacterial infection as the cause of the deaths, but this may be because the patients received large amounts of antibiotics, said the authors of the study published online Aug. 31 in the journal Nature Microbiology.
- The death rate for U.S. COVID-19 patients who have to be put on mechanical respirators is about 70%.

What Does COVID-19 Do to Your Lungs?
From WebMD [4]:
- When the virus gets in your body, it comes into contact with the mucous membranes that line your nose, mouth, and eyes. The virus enters a healthy cell and uses the cell to make new virus parts. It multiplies, and the new viruses infect nearby cells.
- Think of your respiratory tract as an upside-down tree. The trunk is your trachea, or windpipe. It splits into smaller and smaller branches in your lungs. At the end of each branch are tiny air sacs called alveoli. This is where oxygen goes into your blood and carbon dioxide comes out.
- The new coronavirus can infect the upper or lower part of your respiratory tract. It travels down your airways. The lining can become irritated and inflamed. In some cases, the infection can reach all the way down into your alveoli.
- COVID-19 is a new condition, and scientists are learning more every day about what it can do to your lungs. They believe that the effects on your body are similar to those of two other coronavirus diseases, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Mild and Moderate COVID Cases:
- About 80% of people who have COVID-19 get mild to moderate symptoms. You may have a dry cough or a sore throat. Some people have pneumonia, a lung infection in which the alveoli are inflamed.

Severe Cases:
- About 14% of COVID-19 cases are severe, with an infection that affects both lungs. As the swelling gets worse, your lungs fill with fluid and debris.
- You might also have more serious pneumonia. The air sacs fill with mucus, fluid, and other cells that are trying to fight the infection. This can make it harder for your body to take in oxygen. You may have trouble breathing or feel short of breath. You may also breathe faster.

Critical Cases:
- In critical COVID-19 -- about 5% of total cases -- the infection can damage the walls and linings of the air sacs in your lungs. As your body tries to fight it, your lungs become more inflamed and fill with fluid. This can make it harder for them to swap oxygen and carbon dioxide.
- You might have severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the most critical cases, your lungs need help from a machine called a ventilator to do their job.
- There’s evidence that 20-30% of the critically ill patients can develop clots in the lungs, heart, brain and legs, some of which are life threatening.

Delta cases show 300 times higher viral load
From the Reuters [5]:
- People infected with the more transmissible Delta variant have a viral load 300 times higher than those with the original version of the COVID-19 virus, when symptoms are first observed, a South Korea study found.
- But the amount gradually decreased over time - to 30 times in four days and over 10 times in nine days - and it matched levels seen in other variants after 10 days, the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) said on Tuesday.
- The higher load means the virus spreads far more easily from person to person, increasing infections and hospitalisations, a health ministry official Lee Sang-won told a news conference.

COVID-19 Global statistics this week - Reuters World Coronavirus Tracker And Maps


Sources:
[1] A new COVID-19 variant called Mu that might be able to evade immunity from vaccines has been detected in almost every US state - Business Insider
[2] What to Know About COVID Viral Load - WebMD
[3] High Viral Load in Lungs Drives Fatal COVID-19 - WebMD
[4] What Does COVID-19 Do to Your Lungs? - WebMD
[5] Reuters - Delta cases show 300 times higher viral load
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
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Read the paragraphs below......doesnt this just say it all? (my highlighting & underlining )



Q: How Does Vaccination Affect Viral Load?
A: If you’re vaccinated, you’re far less likely to get COVID-19 from someone else, no matter the viral load of the infected person. In the uncommon instances that a breakthrough infection happens, your symptoms are likely to be far less serious. You may even have none.

Q: What’s the Best Way to Protect Against High Viral Load?
- The best thing is to avoid infection altogether. That way you’re less likely to get sick and less likely to pass COVID-19 to others. Remember, COVID-19 can cause serious and even life-threatening illness.
- By far the best way to avoid infection is to get vaccinated. It provides excellent protection both against infection and against the most serious aspects of the illness.

@arochester , I am not so sure I would be hanging my hat on that remedy!!
garlic cloves can achieve quite a bit (especially in the kichen) but as a remedy for C19 ?!

""People commonly use garlic for high blood pressure, high levels of cholesterol or other fats in the blood, and hardening of the arteries. It is also used for the common cold, osteoarthritis, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. There is also no good evidence to support using garlic for COVID-19""

Good find !
 
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