• We had to restore from a backup today after a failed software update. Backup was from 0000 EDT and restored it at 0800 EDT so we lost about 8hrs. Today is 07/20/2024. More info here.

Australia - The Land Down Under

Not all these pics are from Australia.....just a few

But beauty is recognised the world over, not just Down Under...

 



2949753

Credit:https://www.weatherzone.com.au/
 
Is this subject contentious......Yes..almost certainly

Is it political........probably not.

Any people out there with young sons/daughters wishing to or actually studying medicine......need to read this guys account.

Does this relate to just Australia....Almost certainly not.

 
A Tale of Bravery in Gundagai An Old Australian Story That Should Be Told
I notice that the good citizenry of Gundagai finally recognized the town’s one true hero (not a manufactured one – but a person who risked his life to help fellow humans) in June this year over 160 years ago.
It is a cautionary tale of European arrogance and of Aboriginal bravery. For nearly two decades the Wiradjuri people living along the banks of the Murrumbidgee River at Gundagai had been warning of a potentially catastrophic flood. The river’s indigenous name wasn’t “one big water” for nothing.
Typically the European settlers took no notice and built their settlement on the floodplain beside the river. Consequently, on the night of 24 June, 1852, after three weeks of solid rain, the Murrumbidgee broke its banks and poured through the riverside town.
The results are still recorded as the worst natural disaster in Australia’s history. One third of the town’s residents (83 out of a population of 250) were drowned and 71 buildings were destroyed or washed away. It was a cruel consequence of a refusal to listen to the advice of people who had been living in the area for tens of thousands of years.
Cometh the hour, cometh the man! At this point let me hand the story over to Kamilaroi man and one-time editor of Tracker magazine, Chris Munro: “The population of Gundagai were now either on the roofs of their houses, or had chanced a perilous swim to higher ground to escape the rising water level … [when a young Wiradjuri man, Yarri, sprang into action.
“Yarri launched into the now kilometre wide flood zone in a traditional bark canoe he’d carved himself from local timber. Many dwellings had already been washed away, torn off their foundations and sent downstream with their human cargo.
“In the black of night, Yarri was guided by the screams of survivors clinging to trees and rooftops in the freezing waters. Dodging huge logs and other debris, he went back and forth rescuing anyone he could find. He spent the entire night in his canoe, paddling up and down stream to conduct rescue after rescue. His canoe would usually only hold one person, but such were the water skills of Yarri, he ferried up to six people at a time to a safe spot on the river bank.
“John Spencer … the Inn Keeper spent 36 hours in a tree until Yarri came for him. Spencer was near frozen and completely naked at the time, save for a cash box strapped around his neck.
“Whole families were torn from the roofs of their houses, the carcases of sheep, horses and cattle were found wedged in the branches of trees the following day … Yarri saved 49 people from the great flood over a 40-hour period.
“In a disaster of any kind, such a truly amazing act of bravery is simply mind-blowing, but given the date was 1852 and Yarri was atop a bark canoe in the black of night, it makes this yarn all the more astounding. But what’s perhaps more mind boggling is the lack of recognition in Australian history books of such a superhuman feat. There’s no poetry, folk song or bronze statue to honour Yarri in Gundagai.”
Well, Chris, the locals have finally put up a sculpture. A small recognition for one of the greatest acts of heroism in Australia’s history.
No photo description available.
 
Last edited:
If you have a problem with the slaughtering of tens of thousands of ants, do not watch this:


Be sure to watch the second part:

 
....And that's no bull !!!

2023-11-30_16-53.png
 
Dust storm, anyone ?

 
Dust storm, anyone ?

I was in a rental car in Dubai in about 2010 and a 'haboob' (dust storm) hit. I couldn't see a thing. I pulled off to what I hoped was the side of the road and waited. It didn't take too long to pass, maybe 15 minutes, but the paint took some damage as did the glass on the rear window - it looked like it had been lightly scoured through the protective coating, which I suppose it had been.

Stay safe!!! I couldn't see a thing.
 
So all the people using 3G will have buy new phones and pay more for 4G and 5G services...what a lucky country we live in.

Or, maintaining old technology for the sake of a few users is expensive and unnecessary. At some point, you've got to cut it loose. I don't know about Australia, but 3G phones haven't been sold for quite a few years.

(That's my thinking on the matter.)

At some point, it was okay to take down the telegraph lines.

Along the same lines, I recall Australia having a big 'broadband for the masses' initiative. How's that going? I seem to recall hearing some complaints.
 
Broadband for the masses etc, became, and still is, a political football.

As a result, there are still promises being made and still being broken.

Is the broadband sufficient to put a smile on everyones face?...No.

It is a lot better than the old adsl.....but many would even disagree with that...based on their experiences I guess.

It will eventually be a good system when the pollies stop messing with it.
 
It will eventually be a good system when the pollies stop messing with it.

That'd be cool if it was. I'm rooting for you. A town nearby is doing something similar but at a much smaller scale. I'm sort of hopeful that it means fiber is close to me and I can eventually tie into it, but I'm not expecting to benefit from it. I'm definitely rooting for you. You're a rather large country for a project like that.

This is just a factor for living where I live. I've learned to be content with 10 MB/sec. If I get that much, it's all good. It's seldom that high, but it has been fairly stable lately.
 
The NBN (no bloody network) is a joke...still get dropouts. On the news last night it was announced...big update for the NBN...yeah right more BS.
m09004.gif


Speaking of 5G...two weeks ago Optus upgraded their network for 5G and the whole network shut down for 10 hours...no phone...network...no landline...no nothing and they wouldn't say why...it took an insider to spill the beans.
t1935.gif


I have a 5G phone but use 4G because 5G is too expensive...what a bloody joke and Telstra's no better either.
t2407.gif
 
For my money, in Australia, TPG is the way to go

Uses the Vodafone network for mobile. Their Internet stays on. Rock solid.

Optus?...wouldn't touch them with a forty foot pole. Cheap and nasty.

Telstra?...money hungry and unreliable.
 
For my money, in Australia, TPG is the way to go

Uses the Vodafone network for mobile. Their Internet stays on. Rock solid.

Optus?...wouldn't touch them with a forty foot pole. Cheap and nasty.

Telstra?...money hungry and unreliable.

The problem is...all the little ones use either Optus or Telstra for their networks. My mobile phone is with Moose mobile an excellent company but uses the Optus network...that's the problem.
m1512.gif
 
Hmm... Moose Mobile would be something I'd expect to see in my neighborhood.

I'm no expert, but I don't think moose are native to Australia. I didn't see everything while I was there, but I didn't see any moose.
 
Hmm... Moose Mobile would be something I'd expect to see in my neighborhood.

I'm no expert, but I don't think moose are native to Australia. I didn't see everything while I was there, but I didn't see any moose.

Of cause we have Moose...here's one on the Great Western Highway in Sydney NSW...
moose.jpg


We also have Camels too.
m1204.gif
 


Top